News and Research on Magnesium for Sleep

Archive for the ‘magnesium heart’ Category

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Marvelous Magnesium – from Maggie Tiggles

I’ve been able to stay healthy enough to limit my doctor visits to a yearly checkup for the past few years. I take one prescription. Much of my strategy involves natural foods and remedies, exercise, sleep, plenty of clean water, and several supplements. One of my health-building-blocks is magnesium. I take magnesium supplements totaling anywhere […]

via Marvelous Magnesium — Maggie Tiggles

This is an interesting article my Maggie Tiggles about the many marvelous benefits of magnesium.  Maggie has had relief from the following health conditions by using magnesium: leg cramps, constipation, knee stiffness, neck and shoulder stiffness and muscle twitches.

Another famous and proven use of magnesium is for sleeplessness and insomnia.  One of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency is chronic insomnia, accompanied with with frequent nighttime awakenings.  On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep, per a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.

This natural health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and a supplier of natural remedies since 2002.  Nutrition Breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D.

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Vitamin A Proven Beneficial for Sleep and Insomnia

vitamin a sleepWhich vitamins and minerals are the most famous ones for their role in supporting good sleep?  These definitely would be calcium, magnesium and vitamin D.

For example, a study in the European Neurology Journal tested calcium levels in the blood during sleep and discovered that calcium peaks at a high point during the deepest levels of sleep such as the rapid eye movement phase (REM), when dreaming occurs.

Recent studies are showing that a lesser-known vitamin also plays a vital role in preventing insomnia – the eye strengthening Vitamin A.

With the National Sleep Foundation reporting that close to 60% of Americans are experiencing sleeplessness and insomnia at least a few nights per week, many people are spending a lot of time and energy searching for some effective, natural ways to sleep better.  One study on vitamin A that’s related to sleep was published in the PLOS Journal (Public Library of Science).

The researchers selected 2,459 adults aged 20 to 85.  They discovered that people who have lower blood levels of vitamin A have higher odds of having a shorter sleep duration (i.e. 5-6 hours per night), compared to those with more vitamin A having a better sleep duration (7-8 hours per night).

Vitamin A, long-known for its benefits to healthy eyes and vision, is also a key to helping regulate the sleep-wake cycle.  When light from the sun enters the eyes, it’s vitamin A that provides the middle step for the brain to then know it’s day and not night.  With adequate vitamin A in the eyes at night when it’s dark, one’s night vision will be strong – unless most of the vitamin A is used up for its light translation duties in the day time. If the eyes are weaker at night, this is a possible sign of vitamin A deficiency. When the vitamin A sunlight signal grows weaker, the body knows it’s nearing time to go to sleep.

The best ways to get adequate vitamin A is through whole foods – namely egg yolks, butter, vegetables with a green, yellow and orange color, liver and cod liver oil.  Vitamin A supplements are also an option, but are best taken as part of a diet that includes healthy sources of vitamin A, as well as good sources of other important vitamins and minerals.  Eating a healthy diet would include grass fed meats, poultry and fish, a rainbow of organic vegetables, and good fats like avocados, coconut oil and olive oil.

Another thing to consider for helping to prevent insomnia is reducing the use of electronics and TV at night or at least turning them off an hour before bed, in order to limit their melatonin-blocking effects. In an article from the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the researchers said: “Our study showed that a two-hour exposure to light from self-luminous electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about 22 percent.  Stimulating the human circadian (wake-sleep cycle) system to this level may affect sleep in those using the devices prior to bedtime.”

Magnesium has been shown in several studies to relieve insomnia. In one study from the University of Iran, people with insomnia were given magnesium tablets twice a day for eight weeks.  They experienced significant increases in quality sleep time, with less night time interruptions and fewer early morning awakenings.  Magnesium can be found in foods such as green leafy vegetables, pumpkin seeds, almonds, avocados, figs, bananas, brown rice, and other nuts and seeds.  Magnesium supplements are a good option as well, particularly those containing magnesium citrate which is highly absorbable.

One supplement shown to have good results for insomnia is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This formula contains highly absorbable forms of calcium citrate and magnesium citrate, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength and menopause insomnia.  It also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals — I*m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them.  I*m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

To sum it up, good strategies for sleeping well and avoiding insomnia include having some good sun exposure during the day, limiting use of electronic devices at night, doing some regular moderate exercise, eating a nutritious diet, and using some key supplements.

This natural health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2016/10/10/sleep-vitamins-and-remedies-vitamin-a-proven-beneficial/

Signs of Magnesium Deficiency: Studies to Remedy Sleep, Bones, Headaches

Magnesium deficiency signsMagnesium is one of the most vital minerals for good health. It’s involved in over 300 functions in the body and is a required partner for enzymes which allows them to do their job.

Enzymes are high-energy protein molecules that are the spark for positive reactions in all the cells of the body and magnesium helps to provide the spark. A deficiency of magnesium can result in muscle aches and pains, leg cramps, fatigue, insomnia, migraine headaches, restless leg syndrome, bone loss, anxiety and high blood pressure.

Osteoporosis
From the journal of Biology and Trace Element Research comes a study showing that magnesium prevents bone loss in postmenopausal women. The women were given magnesium citrate for 30 days and at the end of the trial, the structural collagen in their bones increased and bone loss was halted.

Insomnia
In a study from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran, research was done with 46 adults who were experiencing insomnia.  Taking two magnesium oxide tablets twice a day resulted in significant increases in sleep time and reduced cortisol levels in the body, which is a stress hormone that can keep people awake. In another research study from the Human Nutrition Research Center of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, scientists found that a high magnesium diet is associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep.

High Blood Pressure
Hypertension or high blood pressure is a leading cause of stroke. A stroke happens when the blood supply to the brain is reduced, which causes damage to brain cells. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition analyzed the role of magnesium in preventing stroke and found that taking magnesium each day reduces stroke risk by 8%.

Restless Leg Syndrome
A study from the Journal “Sleep” showed positive results for restless leg syndrome. Magnesium was administered orally in the evening over a period of 4-6 weeks. Following magnesium treatment, restless leg movements associated with waking in the night decreased significantly. The researchers said: “Our study indicates that magnesium treatment may be a useful alternative therapy.”

Migraines
Studies have found that people with migraine headaches have low concentrations of magnesium in their body. The word “cephalalgia” literally means head pain or headache. In a German study of 81 migraine patients published in the journal “Cephalalgia”, 42 percent of the people taking oral magnesium reduced both the duration and intensity of their migraine attacks. They also reduced their reliance on medications to control migraines.

One supplement shown to be effective for insomnia and pain is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This formula contains highly absorbable magnesium citrate and calcium citrate, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength and menopause insomnia.  It also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.R.C. of Massachusetts says: “I had become dependent on sleeping drugs and couldn’t sleep without them. Now I take the Sleep Minerals before bed and I can sleep through the night without drugs. I’m also able to easily fall back to sleep if I do have to get up. Another benefit is it helps alleviate my chronic fatigue and aches and pains.”

Magnesium is more than a magnificent supplement. It’s a vital natural measure that can be used to maintain or restore one’s good health. For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2016/01/17/signs-of-magnesium-deficiency-studies-show-remedies/

Proven Magnesium Benefits for Insomnia, Hot Flashes, Heart, Bones, More

magnesium sleepWhat are some of the qualities that make magnesium such an essential mineral, required by the body for literally hundreds of its functions? One key feature of magnesium is that it’s a partner or “co-factor” with enzymes that allows them to do their work.

Enzymes are energized protein molecules that travel directly through the bloodstream and initiate chemical reactions inside the cells — orchestrating life’s processes in every organ, gland, tissue and cell. But they cannot operate alone.

As an enzyme co-factor, magnesium allows muscles and nerves to relax, regulates blood sugar, creates a normal heart rhythm and cholesterol level, contributes to energy production and strengthens bones. It has widespread effects in the body similar to hormones, with the difference being the body cannot manufacture magnesium; it must be consumed from food and supplements.

Because of its many benefits, research studies are finding magnesium helps insomnia, hot flashes, heart health, bone strength, diabetes, migraine headaches and more.

According to the Human Nutrition Research Center of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency is chronic insomnia. A lack of magnesium causes restless sleep with frequent awakenings during the night. In one of their research studies, a diet high in magnesium contributed to deeper sleep with fewer interruptions.

Hot flashes are a common, uncomfortable symptom of premenopause and menopause. In a study from the Virginia University Health System, women who experienced hot flashes many times per week received 400 milligrams of magnesium oxide for 4 weeks — increasing to 800 milligrams per day if needed. At the end of the study, magnesium supplements had reduced their frequency of hot flashes by half. Fatigue, sweating, and distress were also significantly reduced.

Magnesium is also magnificent for the heart. In a study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, research scientists examined data from thousands of women over the course of a 26-year follow up period. The women who consumed the highest amounts of magnesium had a 34% reduced risk of sudden cardiac death. Another study from the journal “Circulation” found that magnesium supplements allow people with heart disease to exercise for longer times and it actually helps repair the ability of blood vessels to open up.

Supplements with well-absorbed forms of magnesium are becoming increasingly popular for those with insomnia or hot flashes. One of the more effective ones is Sleep Minerals II from http://Nutrition Breakthroughs. It contains calcium and magnesium in combination with vitamin D and zinc.  The minerals and vitamins are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils; creating a creamy paste inside that results in quick absorption and a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Sadie D. from the Netherlands says: “I am ever so grateful that I discovered Sleep Minerals II after suffering with premenopause and now the real menopause insomnia.  I felt like I was slowly losing my mind due to the continual lack of sleep. I can’t express the relief of getting a good night’s sleep and being able to function properly.”

Magnesium is one of the super-heroes of nutritional remedies. For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.

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