News and Research on Magnesium for Sleep

Posts tagged ‘best magnesium for sleep’

Vitamin E Prevents Muscle Loss with Age, Remedies Hot Flashes: Studies

vitamin e*********************************
This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II

*********************************
A study from the journal “Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity” (see definition for “oxidative” below), has demonstrated that vitamin E can prevent and treat the loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs as people age. Vitamin E was also shown in recent research from “Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation” to be a natural alternative to estrogen therapy and an effective remedy for hot flashes and night sweats.

Regarding the word “oxidative”, this refers to the process in our bodies where we process the oxygen we breathe in and our cells produce energy from it.  This process can become imbalanced and create a state of “oxidative stress” if we don’t consume enough “anti” oxidants such as vitamins E, C and A.  Besides the body’s own natural digestion and metabolism functions, other sources of oxidative stress can include pollution, medications or drugs, smoking, infection, stress, toxins or a poor diet.

The researchers from the journal of “Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity” explain that a reduced level of vitamin E or a deficiency in the body is associated with an increased risk of muscle atrophy (shrinkage).  The vitamin can prevent muscle damage and encourage muscle regeneration.  Muscles in the body are particularly susceptible to oxidative damage as these are the site of the highest consumption of oxygen. Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin that greatly boosts cellular antioxidant capacity.  Because of this, vitamin E can be beneficial for preventing the effects of aging and for also treating infections, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and neurological disorders.

While vitamin E is famous for the health benefits it provides to glands, organs and the heart, it may not be generally known that vitamin E is a proven remedy for menopausal hot flashes and night sweats.

A hot flash, also called a hot flush, is a sudden unexpected feeling of warmth and often a breakout of sweat in the upper half of the body. These flashes occur with up to 80% of women around the time of menopause, and men can also have them due to a lessening of testosterone at middle age.  A night sweat is a “hot flash” that occurs in the night, often while one is sleeping, and can cause frequent awakenings.

Vitamin E was shown in a recent study from Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation to be a natural alternative to estrogen therapy and an effective remedy for hot flashes.  The researchers found there were significant statistical differences in the hot flash severity score after women took a 400 IU vitamin E (softgel cap) daily for 4 weeks.  They concluded that based on the trial, vitamin E brings relief and is a recommended hot flash treatment.

Adelle Davis, the first nutritionist to base her recommendations on science-based studies, says: “During the menopause the need for vitamin E soars ten to fifty times over that previously required. Hot flashes and night sweats often disappear when 50 to 500 units of vitamin E are taken daily, but they quickly recur should the vitamin be stopped.”

Calcium is also directly related to night sweats and our cycles of sleep.  In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase.  The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep or disturbed REM sleep, are related to a calcium deficiency.  Restoration to the normal course of sleep was achieved following the normalization of the blood calcium level.

Regarding the need for calcium need at the time of menopause Davis says: “During the menopause, the lack of the ovarian hormones (estrogen and progesterone) causes severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur. At these times, high amounts of calcium should be obtained and every step be taken to insure its absorption into the blood. When these precautions are taken and the diet is adequate in other respects, the woman at menopause usually loses her irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, insomnia, and mental depression.”

One supplement that contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  It is a proven remedy for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia, hot flashes, night sweats, and teenage insomnia. Sleep Minerals also contains vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form mixed with natural rice bran oil, making it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable. After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep. I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

This natural health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of natural remedies since 2002. For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2017/11/11/vitamin-e-proven-to-protect-muscles-from-aging/

Advertisements

Cool off Hot Flashes and Night Sweats: Tips and Sleep Remedies

A high percentage of women in the premenopause and postmenopause years experience hot flashes and night sweats.  In fact, the National Institutes of Health recently published a report called the “State-of-the-Science Statement on the Management of Menopause-Related Symptoms”.  In this article, the authors write that 30% to 80% of women in menopause regularly experience this sudden, intense, hot, perspiring feeling in their face and upper body.

A diminished level of estrogen has a direct effect on the hypothalamus, the part of the brain responsible for controlling our body temperature, sleep cycles, and hormones.  The menopausal drop in estrogen confuses the hypothalamus, which is sometimes referred to as the body’s “thermostat”, and makes it read “too hot.”

Lifestyle Tips

Here are some things you can do to reduce the discomfort from hot flashes and night sweats:

Dress in layers so you can peel them off as you get warmer.  Stick to loose clothing of cotton, linen or rayon and avoid synthetic fabrics and wool.  Check into “Wicking Nightwear”.  These nightclothes are designed to whisk away sweat and moisture and keep you dry and comfortable while you sleep.  Cotton sheets are best.

Have you heard of “Cleavage Coolers”?  These are small fabric covered gel packs that can be frozen overnight.  When a hot flash starts, place one inside your shirt or bra to help you cool down fast.  These stay cold in your bra for up to three hours.

Use full-size fans, a ceiling fan, or an air conditioner to cool off your space at work or home.  A portable hand-held battery-operated fan can also be kept in your purse.  Also keep a thermos of ice water with you at work and at home.

Try a “Chillow” pillow insert for night sweats.  The Chillow is filled with water and placed inside the pillowcase, on top of the pillow.  It absorbs and dissipates heat to keep you cooler and doesn’t require refrigeration.  It is comfortably cool, rather than cold and it always stays dry.

Menopause Remedies

Hops flowers are best known for their role in brewing beer.  You can also find hops extract in herbal remedies designed to calm and relax.  In one animal study from the Journal of Endocrinology, the phyto (plant) estrogen from hops was found to be equally as effective as an estrogen drug in reducing hot flashes and lowering high body temperature in menopause.  In fact, the beneficial effects lasted five days after the hops extract was withdrawn, compared to four days after the estrogen.

Vitamin E is a proven remedy for hot flashes. One study supporting vitamin E is from the University of Iran, published in “Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation” in 2007.  400 IU of vitamin E in a softgel cap was given to the participants daily for four weeks.  A diary was used to measure hot flashes before the study and at the end. The researchers concluded that vitamin E is an effective, recommended treatment for hot flashes.

Sleep Remedies

According to the journal article on the management of menopause-related symptoms, women seem to have more sleep disturbances as they progress through the menopausal stages. The prevalence of sleep disturbance varies from 39% to 47% in perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% in postmenopause.  Night sweats and hot flashes can become a form of insomnia in which a woman wakes up drenched in sweat and unable to sleep.

Regarding mineral deficiency at the time of menopause, Nutritionist Adelle Davis says, “The amount of calcium in a woman’s blood parallels the activity of the ovaries.  During the menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur, including irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, and insomnia.  These problems can be easily overcome if the intakes of calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D are all generously increased and are well absorbed.”

One insomnia remedy becoming popular among menopausal women is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This natural sleep remedy contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and after several days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

So if you are suffering with hot flashes or night sweats, try some of the ideas above to stay cool as a cucumber!

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, click here.

New Reviews of Top Natural Sleep Aid Sleep Minerals II

Sleep better with Sleep Minerals II natural sleep aidThere are a high percentage of people who encounter nightly insomnia and sleeplessness all over the world.  In the United States, the National Sleep Foundation reports that up to 25% of adults have tried sleeping drugs in an effort to get some sleep.  These medications come with extensive side effects and are not always effective.

Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs is a natural insomnia remedy that contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium.  Customer reviews show that it works well for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, muscle cramps, menopause insomnia, hot flashes, night sweats, and teenage insomnia.

Sleep Minerals II also contains vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form mixed with natural rice bran oil, making it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

James F. Balch, M.D., author of “Prescription for Nutritional Healing,” writes that: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.”

Here are some of the latest reviews of Sleep Minerals II from customers all over the world:

S.K. of Indianapolis, Indiana says: “I have been using Sleep Minerals II. I use it religiously every single night. I suffered from YEARS of anxiety-related insomnia. Nothing helped. My doctor couldn’t find a medicinal combination of medications to treat my anxiety well enough to allow me to get some good sleep. On my first night of Sleep Minerals II, I was able to sleep all the way through the night. I’ve been using it for almost two years now. I am absolutely 1000% satisfied with this product and have even recommended it to my friends and family when they discuss their sleep issues with me.”

K. C. of Homer, New York says: “I am writing to you a true believer of Sleep Minerals II.  I never write product reviews…. good or bad.  I had originally ordered your sleep minerals product and thought I would give it a try.  Well I had given it to the entire family.  We ran out of it and I really thought it wasn’t working.  I quickly realized within a couple nights that without them the entire household was not falling asleep as easily as they were before!  So I immediately ordered more.  I will not let that happen again.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

I.C. of Ontario, Canada says: “I have Lupus, which is an autoimmune condition.  I’m not allowed to take vitamins like vitamin C or anything that builds up my immune system.  If I do, my immune system gets stronger and attacks me.  I have diabetes, a thyroid condition, arthritis and other issues.  The Sleep Minerals is just subtle enough that it helps me sleep and gives me the minerals I need – especially calcium. I have arthritis throughout my whole body and the minerals help this a lot.  In fact, the Sleep Minerals lessens all of my symptoms greatly and has helped me to go into remission.”

W.W. of Perth, Australia says: “I have been taking the Sleep Minerals for the past 15 nights and am noticing an improvement in my ability to go back to sleep when waking during the night.  I have also been able to start reducing the medication that I have been taking for the past 7 years for sleep.  I will definitely keep taking them and hope to keep reducing the prescription meds and continue to feel more rested during the day.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

J.H. of Manitoba, Canada says: “Sleep Minerals II has made a huge difference in my life as I was having debilitating leg cramps that used to occur every night.  My legs were sore even into the next day.  These have now become history.  My sleep is also so much better and now I don’t worry constantly about my calcium and magnesium levels.  I am 70 years old and look forward to a very healthy old age. I suffered with sleep deprivation for a very long time and I will continue to pass the word on to my friends about how Sleep Minerals II has changed my life.”

M. T. of Tasmania, Australia says: “I received the Sleep Minerals II about a week ago and have been taking the softgels about an hour before bed. The last two nights I have slept well. The best side effect I have found, however, is that the night sweats and hot flashes I had constantly throughout the day, have almost completely stopped. And if I do have one, it is 95% less than I previously experienced. So far I’m very happy with the Sleep Minerals.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2018/02/08/newest-reviews-of-sleep-minerals-ii-worldwide/

Why Do Some People Get a Charley Horse? – Magnesium for Sleep

young women calf pain on white backgroundBy Dr. Joseph Mercola, a physician trained in both traditional and natural medicine who provides up-to-date natural health information.
****************
This article is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium, magnesium and vitamin D based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.
****************
A charley horse, or muscle cramp particularly in your calf muscles, is an incredibly common condition that results in your muscles becoming tight, stiff and extremely painful. If you’re an adult, there’s a good chance you’ve had one at some point (and likely multiple points) during your lifetime.

In case you’re a trivia buff and wondering why these muscle cramps are referred to as “charley horses” (a name that’s primarily used in North America), it’s said to be a tribute to Charley “Old Hoss” Radbourne, an 1880s-era baseball pitcher who often suffered from muscle cramps during games.

Another version states the term came from a lame work horse named Charley who limped around doing various jobs around the baseball park (also in the 1880s).

Whenever a baseball player would get injured or have a cramp in the lower legs, thus limping around like Charley the horse, teammates would call the player “Charley Horse.” Regardless of the name’s origin, the pain of a charley horse is unmistakable and can be excruciating.

What Causes a Charley Horse?

According to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, about 1 in every 3 adults is affected by muscle cramps in their lower limbs. In many cases, the pain is temporary and goes away on its own, but for some the cramps interfere with sleep, quality of life and daily activities.

In one study of more than 500 people aged 60 years and older, 31 percent reported being woken up by muscle cramps and 15 percent had cramps more than three times a month. Anyone can get a charley horse, but they’re most common in the following populations and scenarios:

  • During exercise
  • At nighttime, especially in the elderly
  • In pregnant women
  • In people with neurological disease
  • During kidney dialysis

It’s not clear what triggers a charley horse to occur, but it is thought the cramp may be related to a rapidly firing nerve (up to 150 electrical dischargers per second), which causes the muscle to tense up, as opposed to an issue with the muscle tissue itself.

Many medications are also associated with muscle cramps, including statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, ACE inhibitors (blood pressure drugs), certain asthma drugs, diuretics and more. In addition, the following factors may also increase your risk of a charley horse:

  • Poor blood circulation in your legs
  • Muscle fatigue
  • Dehydration
  • Mineral deficiencies, including magnesium, potassium or calcium

magnesium and menopauseIs Magnesium Deficiency Causing Your Charley Horses?

By some estimates, up to 80 percent of Americans are not getting enough magnesium and may be deficient. Other research shows only about 25 percent of U.S. adults are getting the recommended daily amount of 310 to 320 milligrams (mg) for women and 400 to 420 for men.

Magnesium is often thought of primarily as a mineral for your heart and bones, but this is misleading. Researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, indicating that its role in human health and disease may have been vastly underestimated.

Further, if you suffer from charley horses, low levels of magnesium could be to blame. Magnesium is necessary for activating muscles and nerves, and a key sign of ongoing magnesium deficiency can be muscle contractions and cramps like charley horses.

Magnesium deficiency may be particularly problematic for your muscles in the presence of an overabundance of calcium. Americans in general tend to have a higher calcium-to-magnesium ratio in their diet, averaging about 3.5-to-1.

If you have too much calcium and not enough magnesium, your muscles will tend to go into spasm. According to Dr. Carolyn Dean, a medical and naturopathic doctor:

“What happens is the muscle and nerve function that magnesium is responsible for is diminished. If you don’t have enough magnesium, your muscles go into spasm.

Calcium causes muscle to contract. If you had a balance, the muscles would do their thing. They’d relax, contract and create their activity.”

This underscores the importance of eating a nutritious diet, which will naturally give you optimal amounts of the minerals and other nutrients your body needs.

Eating plenty of organic leafy green vegetables, nuts and seeds every day, and drinking fresh green vegetable juice will help keep your magnesium stores replenished. In addition, Epsom salt is a magnesium sulfate that can absorb into your body through your skin.

Soaking in a bath with Epsom salts is an excellent way to not only help prevent magnesium deficiency but also to soothe and relieve the pain of a charley horse.

potassiumLow Potassium Levels May Also Trigger a Charley Horse

Potassium is a mineral and electrolyte. (An electrolyte is a substance that produces an electrical conducting solution when dissolved in water. Electrolytes carry a charge and are essential for life. In our bodies, electrolytes include sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium).

Potassium is essential for your cells, tissues and organs to function properly. It plays a vital role in heart health, digestive and muscular function, bone health and more. One of the symptoms of low potassium levels is muscle cramps.

While potassium is found in many foods commonly consumed in the U.S. — including fruits, vegetables, dairy products, salmon, sardines and nuts — only 2 percent of U.S. adults get the recommended daily amount of 4,700 mg.

This is especially problematic because potassium is a nutrient that needs to be kept in proper balance with sodium in your blood. If you consume too much sodium, which is common if you eat a lot of processed foods, you’ll have an increased need for potassium.

Others who are at particular risk of low potassium, or hypokalemia, are those with chronic malabsorption syndromes, such as Crohn’s disease, or those taking heart medicine (particularly loop diuretics). However, anyone who eats a poor diet — an excess of processed foods and not enough fresh, whole foods — is potentially at risk of inadequate potassium levels and related muscle cramps.

Green vegetable juicing is an excellent way to ensure you’re getting enough nutrients for optimal health, including about 300 mg to 400 mg of potassium per cup. Some additional rich sources of potassium are:

  • Lima beans (955 mg/cup)
  • Winter squash (896 mg/cup)
  • Cooked spinach (839 mg/cup)
  • Avocado (500 mg per medium)

Foods rich in calciumToo Little Calcium May Trigger Muscle Cramps

While too much calcium in the absence of magnesium can be problematic for muscle cramps, so too can a calcium deficiency. Low blood levels of calcium (as well as magnesium) may increase the excitability of nerve endings and the muscles they stimulate.

This may be a trigger for muscle cramps, especially in the elderly and during pregnancy. If you’re deficient in vitamin D, meanwhile, your body may have inadequate calcium absorption, again predisposing you to muscle cramps.

It’s very important to maintain a proper balance of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and also vitamin K2, as these four nutrients perform an intricate dance together, with one supporting the other. If you’re calcium deficient, your best bet is to increase consumption of foods high in calcium before opting for a supplement. This is because many high-calcium foods also contain naturally high amounts of vitamin K2; nature cleverly gives us these two nutrients in combination, so they work optimally.

Good sources of calcium include nuts, seeds and raw, organic, grass-fed dairy especially cheeses, and vegetables, although veggies aren’t high in vitamin K2. One exception is fermented vegetables where a starter culture specifically designed to produce ample amounts of vitamin K2 was used.

Homemade bone broth is another excellent source. Simply simmer leftover bones over low heat for an entire day to extract the calcium from the bones. You can use this broth for soups and stews or drink it straight.

What to Do If You Get a Charley Horse

A charley horse often occurs without notice, sometimes waking you up from sound sleep. If you’re lying down when the pain starts, stand up and put some weight on your foot. Walking around will help to increase blood circulation to your muscles and possibly help to soothe and relax the cramp.

charley horse stretch leg crampYou can also try a simple stretch. If the cramp is in your calf in the back of your lower leg, pull your toes and foot upward until you feel a stretch in the back of your leg. You can also do this sitting down with your legs outstretched. Put a towel around your feet and gently pull both ends toward you until you feel a stretch.

As mentioned, soaking in an Epsom salt bath may also help to relieve pain (and possibly help with prevention). Massaging the area and applying a heat pack, which will increase blood flow to the area, promoting healing and soothing pain, may also help.

Staying well-hydrated is also important for muscle cramp prevention. You’ll want to drink enough pure filtered water so that your urine is pale yellow in color. In addition, performing regular stretching exercises on your legs may help reduce your risk of a charley horse.

This article is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium, magnesium and vitamin D based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

Visit www.Mercola.com for evidence-based health information and free health
e-books.

Best Calcium Rich Foods for Good Sleep and Strong Bones

Calcium foodsGreetings,

Here is a valuable chart of the best food sources of calcium, some of which may actually be a surprise.

Calcium is one of the most famous of all minerals due to its vast array of benefits to our health. Dr. Linus Pauling, the two-time Nobel Prize winner said: “You can trace every sickness, every disease, and every ailment to a mineral deficiency.”

Studies have proven that calcium increases bone health, reduces high blood pressure, relaxes the nerves and muscles, prevents colon cancer and kidney stones, and acts as an effective remedy for insomnia and sleeplessness.

Adelle Davis, one of the first nutritionists to base her recommendations on scientific studies, says:  “A calcium deficiency often shows itself by insomnia, another form of an inability to relax. The harm done by sleeping tablets, to say nothing of the thousands of dollars spent on them, could largely be avoided if the calcium intake were adequate.”

Calcium was discovered by the British chemist Sir Humphry Davy in the early 1800’s.  Regarding stomach and colon health, a 2007 study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that calcium protects high-risk people from developing the polyps (growths in the large intestine) that can lead to cancer in the large bowel.

Calcium supplements were also shown to help prevent kidney stones in a 2008 study at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine.

Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study, published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep or disturbed REM sleep, are related to a calcium deficiency.

William Sears, M.D. writes: “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.”

One calcium-based supplement shown to be effective for insomnia is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This formula contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for menopause insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.  It also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: *The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and couldn‘t go back to sleep. Now I wake up once to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.*

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruptions from hot flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Calcium can be obtained from foods or supplements, and a combination of both may be beneficial to overall health.

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II, as well as Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

 

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2017/09/16/calcium-food-sources-for-good-sleep-bone-health/

10 Healthy Reasons to Get Good Sleep and How to Do It

People are now sleeping less than they did in the past, and sleep quality has decreased as well.

Here are 10 reasons why good sleep is important.

1. Poor Sleep Can Make You Fat

Poor sleep is strongly linked to weight gain.

People with short sleep duration tend to weigh significantly more than those who get adequate sleep.

In fact, short sleep duration is one of the strongest risk factors for obesity.

In one massive review study, children and adults with short sleep duration were 89% and 55% more likely to become obese, respectively.

The effect of sleep on weight gain is believed to be mediated by numerous factors, including hormones and motivation to exercise.

If you are trying to lose weight, getting quality sleep is absolutely crucial.

Bottom Line: Short sleep duration is associated with a drastically increased risk of weight gain and obesity, in both children and adults.

2. Good Sleepers Tend to Eat Fewer Calories

Young Man Wanting to Hit the Alarm Clock

Studies show that sleep deprived individuals have a bigger appetite and tend to eat more calories.

Sleep deprivation disrupts the daily fluctuations in appetite hormones and is believed to cause poor appetite regulation.

This includes higher levels of ghrelin, the hormone that stimulates appetite, and reduced levels of leptin, the hormone that suppresses appetite.

Bottom Line: Poor sleep affects hormones that regulate appetite. Those who get adequate sleep tend to eat fewer calories than those who don’t.

3. Good Sleep Can Improve Concentration and Productivity

Business Man Working

Sleep is important for various aspects of brain function.

This includes cognition, concentration, productivity and performance.

All of these are negatively affected by sleep deprivation.

A study on medical interns provides a good example.

Interns on a “traditional schedule” made 36% more serious medical errors than interns on a schedule that allowed more sleep.

Another study found short sleep can negatively impact some aspects of brain function to a similar degree as alcohol intoxication.

Good sleep, on the other hand, has been shown to improve problem solving skills and enhance memory performance of both children and adults.

Bottom Line: Good sleep can maximize problem solving skills and enhance memory. Poor sleep has been shown to impair brain function.

4. Good Sleep Can Maximize Athletic Performance

Sleep has been shown to enhance athletic performance.

Fit Woman Doing Push Ups

In a study on basketball players, longer sleep was shown to significantly improve speed, accuracy, reaction times, and mental well-being.

Less sleep duration has also been associated with poor exercise performance and functional limitation in elderly women.

A study of over 2,800 women found that poor sleep was linked to slower walking, lower grip strength, and greater difficulty performing independent activities.

Bottom Line: Longer sleep has been shown to improve many aspects of athletic and physical performance.

5. Poor Sleepers Have a Greater Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

Heart and Stethoscope

We know that sleep quality and duration can have a major effect on many risk factors.

These are the factors believed to drive chronic diseases, including heart disease.

A review of 15 studies found that short sleepers are at far greater risk of heart disease or stroke than those who sleep 7 to 8 hours per night.

Bottom Line: Sleeping less than 7-8 hours per night is linked to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

6. Sleep Affects Glucose Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Frustrated Business Man

Experimental sleep restriction affects blood sugar and reduces insulin sensitivity.

In a study of healthy young men, restricting sleep to 4 hours per night for 6 nights in a row caused symptoms of pre-diabetes.

This was then resolved after 1 week of increased sleep duration.

Poor sleep habits are also strongly linked to adverse effects on blood sugar in the general population.

Those sleeping less than 6 hours per night have repeatedly been shown to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

Bottom Line: Sleep deprivation can cause pre-diabetes in healthy adults, in as little as 6 days. Many studies show a strong link between short sleep duration and type 2 diabetes risk.

7. Poor Sleep is Linked to Depression

Mental health issues, such as depression, are strongly linked to poor sleep quality and sleeping disorders.

Woman who Cant Sleep

It has been estimated that 90% of patients with depression complain about sleep quality.

Poor sleep is even associated with increased risk of death by suicide.

Those with sleeping disorders, such as insomnia or obstructive sleep apnea, also report significantly higher rates of depression than those without.

Bottom Line: Poor sleeping patterns are strongly linked to depression, particularly for those with a sleeping disorder.

8. Sleep Improves Your Immune Function

Female Doctor Drinking Coffee

Even a small loss of sleep has been shown to impair immune function.

One large 2-week study monitored the development of the common cold after giving people nasal drops with the virus that causes colds.

They found that those who slept less than 7 hours were almost three times more likely to develop a cold than those who slept 8 hours or more.

If you often get colds, ensuring that you get at least 8 hours of sleep per night could be very helpful. Eating more garlic can help too.

Bottom Line: Getting at least 8 hours of sleep can improve immune function and help fight the common cold.

9. Poor Sleep is Linked to Increased Inflammation

Orange Clock

Sleep can have a major effect on inflammation in the body.

In fact, sleep loss is known to activate undesirable markers of inflammation and cell damage.

Poor sleep has been strongly linked to long-term inflammation of the digestive tract, in disorders known as inflammatory bowel diseases.

One study observed that sleep deprived patients with Crohn’s disease (a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines) were twice as likely to relapse as patients who slept well.

Researchers are even recommending sleep evaluation to help predict outcomes in sufferers of long-term inflammatory issues.

Bottom Line: Sleep affects the body’s inflammatory responses. Poor sleep is strongly linked to inflammatory bowel diseases and can increase the risk of disease recurrence.

10. Sleep Affects Emotions and Social Interactions

Sleep loss reduces our ability to interact socially.

Several studies confirmed this using emotional facial recognition tests.

One study found that people who had not slept had a reduced ability to recognize expressions of anger and happiness.

Researchers believe that poor sleep affects our ability to recognize important social cues and process emotional information.

Take Home Message

Along with nutrition and exercise, good sleep is one of the pillars of health.

You simply can not achieve optimal health without taking care of your sleep.

*****************************************************************************************

Here are some top tips for getting good sleep from Nutrition Breakthroughs:

Tip # 1 – We live in an electronics-oriented world, from computers, to cell phones, to texting, to reading books on tablets. These tools help increase our efficiency and ability to work and learn and communicate, but when it comes to getting good sound sleep, they can interfere.

One study from a university in New York found that exposure to light from electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about twenty two percent. Melatonin is a hormone made in the brain that helps to regulate the sleep/wake cycle. It is present in higher amounts at night. The researchers recommend shutting off all electronic devices at least one hour before bedtime and doing some relaxing things before bed.

Tip # 2 – Regarding sounder, deeper sleep resulting from taking walks, studies at the University of Arizona have found that walking more than six blocks a day at a normal pace significantly improves sleep at night for women.  Scientists suspect that walking helps to set our biological clock into a consistent sleep pattern. Walking can help increase “endorphins”, which are protein-like chemicals made in the brain that can have a relaxing effect, a pain-relieving effect, and can also reduce stress and increase well-being.

Tip # 3 – Sometimes hunger can strike at 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning and keep one awake. If this occurs, eat something with high protein such as turkey. Turkey contains tryptophan, which is an amino acid (a component of protein) that has a calming effect. According to Ray Sahelian, M.D., “Tryptophan ….can be converted at night into melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone.”

As a note, concentrated tryptophan capsules are not recommended as they can create grogginess in the morning and take some time to wear off. Other foods that are high in tryptophan include nuts, seeds, chicken, fish, oats, beans, lentils, and eggs.

Tip # 4 – When taking natural sleep aids, it’s good to remember that each person is a unique individual and doing some experimenting with the dosage can be instrumental in achieving success. At first, err on the side of taking too little rather than too much. Another thing to keep in mind is that natural aids are not drugs and they may not work immediately with the first dose or even the first few doses. It can take up to a couple weeks to see results.

James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.” In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. In the study, taking calcium restored normal sleep patterns.

One example of a mineral-based sleep remedy is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium, magnesium and vitamin D. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

In summary, take the tips of recent research studies and take a walk each day, put the computers and cell phones away an hour before bedtime and do something relaxing, keep a high-tryprophan snack next to your bed at night, and use an effective form of calcium and magnesium before bed for a deeper, longer night’s sleep.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.

*********************************************************************************************

Article source for the 10 Healthy Reasons to Get Good Sleep: https://authoritynutrition.com/10-reasons-why-good-sleep-is-important/

Sage Leaf Proven Effective for Menopause Hot Flashes and Night Sweats

sage for hot flashes

Sage is a delicious herb used in cooking, particularly with poultry and pasta sauces, and it has a long history of use for medicinal purposes.  It belongs to the mint family, along with oregano, rosemary and thyme.

Since ancient times, sage has been used externally to help sprains, joints and swelling.  Internally it’s been used by herbalists to treat sore throats, strengthen the nervous system and improve brain function. Sage leaf is also a well-researched remedy for hot flashes and night sweats in menopause.

The German Health Commission has officially approved the use of sage for excessive sweating and one German study found sage to reduce excessive perspiration by 50%.

In a breakthrough study from Switzerland, researchers examined the use of a fresh sage preparation for treating hot flashes and other menopause symptoms in women.  This was a multi-center trial that took place simultaneously in eight medical practices.  The women were an average age of 56, they were menopausal for at least 12 months, and they experienced 5 or more hot flashes per day.  The women took a daily tablet of fresh sage leaves for 8 weeks.

The changes in the intensity and frequency of their hot flashes were evaluated over the 2 month period.  The average number of hot flashes decreased considerably each week from week 1 to week 8.  Mild hot flashes decreased by 46%, moderate flashes decreased by 62%, severe hot flashes decreased by 79%, and very severe ones decreased by 100%.  The researchers concluded that fresh sage has great value in the treatment of hot flashes and other related menopause symptoms.

Italian scientists have also taken an interest in studying sage for women at menopause.  They set out to study the effects of a combination of sage and alfalfa leaves on symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, dizziness, headaches and heart palpitations.  The researchers noted that these symptoms result from an estrogen deprivation that then affects the nervous system.

The Italian study lasted for three months and followed thirty menopausal women who took a sage and alfalfa supplement daily.  At the end of the study, hot flushes and night sweats had completely disappeared in twenty of them.  Four women showed good improvement and the other six demonstrated reduced symptoms overall – making the combination of sage and alfalfa an effective remedy for menopause discomforts.

The minerals calcium and magnesium have also been the subject of studies on hot flashes.  One study from the Virginia University Health System discovered that magnesium supplements reduced hot flash frequency in women from 52 to 28 per week, which is a 41% reduction.

One natural sleep aid with benefits for hot flashes is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.com.  This remedy contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, teenage insomnia and menopause insomnia.

The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly and fully assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Natural menopause remedies such as sage, alfalfa, calcium and magnesium are healthy options for women with hot flashes, night sweats and insomnia.  For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit this page.

Tag Cloud