News and Research on Magnesium for Sleep

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10 Healthy Reasons to Get Good Sleep and How to Do It

People are now sleeping less than they did in the past, and sleep quality has decreased as well.

Here are 10 reasons why good sleep is important.

1. Poor Sleep Can Make You Fat

Poor sleep is strongly linked to weight gain.

People with short sleep duration tend to weigh significantly more than those who get adequate sleep.

In fact, short sleep duration is one of the strongest risk factors for obesity.

In one massive review study, children and adults with short sleep duration were 89% and 55% more likely to become obese, respectively.

The effect of sleep on weight gain is believed to be mediated by numerous factors, including hormones and motivation to exercise.

If you are trying to lose weight, getting quality sleep is absolutely crucial.

Bottom Line: Short sleep duration is associated with a drastically increased risk of weight gain and obesity, in both children and adults.

2. Good Sleepers Tend to Eat Fewer Calories

Young Man Wanting to Hit the Alarm Clock

Studies show that sleep deprived individuals have a bigger appetite and tend to eat more calories.

Sleep deprivation disrupts the daily fluctuations in appetite hormones and is believed to cause poor appetite regulation.

This includes higher levels of ghrelin, the hormone that stimulates appetite, and reduced levels of leptin, the hormone that suppresses appetite.

Bottom Line: Poor sleep affects hormones that regulate appetite. Those who get adequate sleep tend to eat fewer calories than those who don’t.

3. Good Sleep Can Improve Concentration and Productivity

Business Man Working

Sleep is important for various aspects of brain function.

This includes cognition, concentration, productivity and performance.

All of these are negatively affected by sleep deprivation.

A study on medical interns provides a good example.

Interns on a “traditional schedule” made 36% more serious medical errors than interns on a schedule that allowed more sleep.

Another study found short sleep can negatively impact some aspects of brain function to a similar degree as alcohol intoxication.

Good sleep, on the other hand, has been shown to improve problem solving skills and enhance memory performance of both children and adults.

Bottom Line: Good sleep can maximize problem solving skills and enhance memory. Poor sleep has been shown to impair brain function.

4. Good Sleep Can Maximize Athletic Performance

Sleep has been shown to enhance athletic performance.

Fit Woman Doing Push Ups

In a study on basketball players, longer sleep was shown to significantly improve speed, accuracy, reaction times, and mental well-being.

Less sleep duration has also been associated with poor exercise performance and functional limitation in elderly women.

A study of over 2,800 women found that poor sleep was linked to slower walking, lower grip strength, and greater difficulty performing independent activities.

Bottom Line: Longer sleep has been shown to improve many aspects of athletic and physical performance.

5. Poor Sleepers Have a Greater Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

Heart and Stethoscope

We know that sleep quality and duration can have a major effect on many risk factors.

These are the factors believed to drive chronic diseases, including heart disease.

A review of 15 studies found that short sleepers are at far greater risk of heart disease or stroke than those who sleep 7 to 8 hours per night.

Bottom Line: Sleeping less than 7-8 hours per night is linked to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

6. Sleep Affects Glucose Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Frustrated Business Man

Experimental sleep restriction affects blood sugar and reduces insulin sensitivity.

In a study of healthy young men, restricting sleep to 4 hours per night for 6 nights in a row caused symptoms of pre-diabetes.

This was then resolved after 1 week of increased sleep duration.

Poor sleep habits are also strongly linked to adverse effects on blood sugar in the general population.

Those sleeping less than 6 hours per night have repeatedly been shown to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

Bottom Line: Sleep deprivation can cause pre-diabetes in healthy adults, in as little as 6 days. Many studies show a strong link between short sleep duration and type 2 diabetes risk.

7. Poor Sleep is Linked to Depression

Mental health issues, such as depression, are strongly linked to poor sleep quality and sleeping disorders.

Woman who Cant Sleep

It has been estimated that 90% of patients with depression complain about sleep quality.

Poor sleep is even associated with increased risk of death by suicide.

Those with sleeping disorders, such as insomnia or obstructive sleep apnea, also report significantly higher rates of depression than those without.

Bottom Line: Poor sleeping patterns are strongly linked to depression, particularly for those with a sleeping disorder.

8. Sleep Improves Your Immune Function

Female Doctor Drinking Coffee

Even a small loss of sleep has been shown to impair immune function.

One large 2-week study monitored the development of the common cold after giving people nasal drops with the virus that causes colds.

They found that those who slept less than 7 hours were almost three times more likely to develop a cold than those who slept 8 hours or more.

If you often get colds, ensuring that you get at least 8 hours of sleep per night could be very helpful. Eating more garlic can help too.

Bottom Line: Getting at least 8 hours of sleep can improve immune function and help fight the common cold.

9. Poor Sleep is Linked to Increased Inflammation

Orange Clock

Sleep can have a major effect on inflammation in the body.

In fact, sleep loss is known to activate undesirable markers of inflammation and cell damage.

Poor sleep has been strongly linked to long-term inflammation of the digestive tract, in disorders known as inflammatory bowel diseases.

One study observed that sleep deprived patients with Crohn’s disease (a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines) were twice as likely to relapse as patients who slept well.

Researchers are even recommending sleep evaluation to help predict outcomes in sufferers of long-term inflammatory issues.

Bottom Line: Sleep affects the body’s inflammatory responses. Poor sleep is strongly linked to inflammatory bowel diseases and can increase the risk of disease recurrence.

10. Sleep Affects Emotions and Social Interactions

Sleep loss reduces our ability to interact socially.

Several studies confirmed this using emotional facial recognition tests.

One study found that people who had not slept had a reduced ability to recognize expressions of anger and happiness.

Researchers believe that poor sleep affects our ability to recognize important social cues and process emotional information.

Take Home Message

Along with nutrition and exercise, good sleep is one of the pillars of health.

You simply can not achieve optimal health without taking care of your sleep.

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Here are some top tips for getting good sleep from Nutrition Breakthroughs:

Tip # 1 – We live in an electronics-oriented world, from computers, to cell phones, to texting, to reading books on tablets. These tools help increase our efficiency and ability to work and learn and communicate, but when it comes to getting good sound sleep, they can interfere.

One study from a university in New York found that exposure to light from electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about twenty two percent. Melatonin is a hormone made in the brain that helps to regulate the sleep/wake cycle. It is present in higher amounts at night. The researchers recommend shutting off all electronic devices at least one hour before bedtime and doing some relaxing things before bed.

Tip # 2 – Regarding sounder, deeper sleep resulting from taking walks, studies at the University of Arizona have found that walking more than six blocks a day at a normal pace significantly improves sleep at night for women.  Scientists suspect that walking helps to set our biological clock into a consistent sleep pattern. Walking can help increase “endorphins”, which are protein-like chemicals made in the brain that can have a relaxing effect, a pain-relieving effect, and can also reduce stress and increase well-being.

Tip # 3 – Sometimes hunger can strike at 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning and keep one awake. If this occurs, eat something with high protein such as turkey. Turkey contains tryptophan, which is an amino acid (a component of protein) that has a calming effect. According to Ray Sahelian, M.D., “Tryptophan ….can be converted at night into melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone.”

As a note, concentrated tryptophan capsules are not recommended as they can create grogginess in the morning and take some time to wear off. Other foods that are high in tryptophan include nuts, seeds, chicken, fish, oats, beans, lentils, and eggs.

Tip # 4 – When taking natural sleep aids, it’s good to remember that each person is a unique individual and doing some experimenting with the dosage can be instrumental in achieving success. At first, err on the side of taking too little rather than too much. Another thing to keep in mind is that natural aids are not drugs and they may not work immediately with the first dose or even the first few doses. It can take up to a couple weeks to see results.

James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.” In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. In the study, taking calcium restored normal sleep patterns.

One example of a mineral-based sleep remedy is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium, magnesium and vitamin D. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

In summary, take the tips of recent research studies and take a walk each day, put the computers and cell phones away an hour before bedtime and do something relaxing, keep a high-tryprophan snack next to your bed at night, and use an effective form of calcium and magnesium before bed for a deeper, longer night’s sleep.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.

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Article source for the 10 Healthy Reasons to Get Good Sleep: https://authoritynutrition.com/10-reasons-why-good-sleep-is-important/

Sage Leaf Proven Effective for Menopause Hot Flashes and Night Sweats

sage for hot flashes

Sage is a delicious herb used in cooking, particularly with poultry and pasta sauces, and it has a long history of use for medicinal purposes.  It belongs to the mint family, along with oregano, rosemary and thyme.

Since ancient times, sage has been used externally to help sprains, joints and swelling.  Internally it’s been used by herbalists to treat sore throats, strengthen the nervous system and improve brain function. Sage leaf is also a well-researched remedy for hot flashes and night sweats in menopause.

The German Health Commission has officially approved the use of sage for excessive sweating and one German study found sage to reduce excessive perspiration by 50%.

In a breakthrough study from Switzerland, researchers examined the use of a fresh sage preparation for treating hot flashes and other menopause symptoms in women.  This was a multi-center trial that took place simultaneously in eight medical practices.  The women were an average age of 56, they were menopausal for at least 12 months, and they experienced 5 or more hot flashes per day.  The women took a daily tablet of fresh sage leaves for 8 weeks.

The changes in the intensity and frequency of their hot flashes were evaluated over the 2 month period.  The average number of hot flashes decreased considerably each week from week 1 to week 8.  Mild hot flashes decreased by 46%, moderate flashes decreased by 62%, severe hot flashes decreased by 79%, and very severe ones decreased by 100%.  The researchers concluded that fresh sage has great value in the treatment of hot flashes and other related menopause symptoms.

Italian scientists have also taken an interest in studying sage for women at menopause.  They set out to study the effects of a combination of sage and alfalfa leaves on symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, dizziness, headaches and heart palpitations.  The researchers noted that these symptoms result from an estrogen deprivation that then affects the nervous system.

The Italian study lasted for three months and followed thirty menopausal women who took a sage and alfalfa supplement daily.  At the end of the study, hot flushes and night sweats had completely disappeared in twenty of them.  Four women showed good improvement and the other six demonstrated reduced symptoms overall – making the combination of sage and alfalfa an effective remedy for menopause discomforts.

The minerals calcium and magnesium have also been the subject of studies on hot flashes.  One study from the Virginia University Health System discovered that magnesium supplements reduced hot flash frequency in women from 52 to 28 per week, which is a 41% reduction.

One natural sleep aid with benefits for hot flashes is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.com.  This remedy contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, teenage insomnia and menopause insomnia.

The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly and fully assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Natural menopause remedies such as sage, alfalfa, calcium and magnesium are healthy options for women with hot flashes, night sweats and insomnia.  For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit this page.

Restless Leg Syndrome, Magnesium, and Sleep Minerals II Reviews

restless leg syndrome remediesRestless leg syndrome (RLS) is a form of insomnia that causes an overwhelming urge to move the legs when they are at rest, especially during sleep.

Those who have restless leg syndrome experience unpleasant sensations in the legs described as creeping, crawling, tingling, pulling or painful. Recent research studies have found that people with restless leg syndrome are deficient in the mineral magnesium.

In one study from the Romanian Journal of Neurology, researchers conducted tests in people with restless leg syndrome. They found agitated sleep and frequent periods of night time awakenings, with significantly less of the deeper “rapid eye movement” (REM) sleep – also found in other forms of insomnia caused by magnesium deficiency.

Mineral-based sleep aids are becoming more popular with RLS sufferers. One example is Sleep Minerals II, a drug-free, calcium and magnesium based sleep aid that is one of the more effective restless leg syndrome remedies. The minerals are formulated in a softgel with natural oils, making them more highly absorbable than tablets or capsules. This formula helps everyone from older adults, to teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms – as well as those with restless leg syndrome – to get a good night’s sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy Michigan gives her review and says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for two and a half years and have had restless leg syndrome my entire life. This is the first relief I’ve ever had…it’s gone for a month now.”

J.M. of Florida says: “My restless legs were so bad that after 5:00 p.m. I could hardly sit down for two minutes without my legs moving. After taking the Sleep Minerals II for a while, my restless leg syndrome is greatly diminished and I’ve noticed I’m getting more and more sleep.”

Valerie. H. in Santa Clarita, CA. says: “I had such bad menopause insomnia that I couldn’t fall asleep.  It took me hours to get to sleep even though I was very tired.  I also had creepy crawly feelings in my legs at night.  I got the Sleep Minerals II and started taking it.  I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

Jill C. of Ellensburg, Washington says: “My husband has been struggling with restless leg syndrome his whole life. He couldn’t sleep more than three to five hours unless he took an addictive prescribed narcotic, which he became tolerant to and the insomnia came back with no answers. Now he’s been taking Sleep Minerals II for a week and every night he’s had a great night’s sleep.”

This news is provided to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, provider of natural health articles and effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2015/06/21/restless-leg-syndrome-remedies-sleep-minerals-ii-reviews/

4 Research Studies Show Good Insomnia Remedies

Sleep Minerals IIAlmost six out of ten Americans experience insomnia and sleep problems at least a few nights a week, as reported in a recent study done by the National Sleep Foundation. Insomnia is defined as “An inability to fall asleep or remain asleep long enough to feel rested, especially when the problem continues over time.”

In an effort to combat this, as many as twenty-five percent of the people in the U.S. turn to sleep drugs. Because most people would prefer to avoid the side effects and addiction of sleep medications, research scientists have been busy studying nutritional and lifestyle approaches to getting better sleep.

Tip # 1 – We live in an electronics-oriented world, from computers, to cell phones, to texting, to reading books on tablets. These tools help increase our efficiency and ability to work and learn and communicate, but when it comes to getting good sound sleep, they can interfere.

One study from a university in New York found that exposure to light from electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about twenty two percent. Melatonin is a hormone made in the brain that helps to regulate the sleep/wake cycle. It is present in higher amounts at night. The researchers recommend shutting off all electronic devices at least one hour before bedtime and doing some relaxing things before bed.

Tip # 2 – Regarding sounder, deeper sleep resulting from taking walks, studies at the University of Arizona have found that walking more than six blocks a day at a normal pace significantly improves sleep at night for women.  Scientists suspect that walking helps to set our biological clock into a consistent sleep pattern. Walking can help increase “endorphins”, which are protein-like chemicals made in the brain that can have a relaxing effect, a pain-relieving effect, and can also reduce stress and increase well-being.

Tip # 3 – Sometimes hunger can strike at 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning and keep one awake. If this occurs, eat something with high protein such as turkey. Turkey contains tryptophan, which is an amino acid (a component of protein) that has a calming effect. According to Ray Sahelian, M.D., “Tryptophan ….can be converted at night into melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone.”

As a note, concentrated tryptophan capsules are not recommended as they can create grogginess in the morning and take some time to wear off. Other foods that are high in tryptophan include nuts, seeds, chicken, fish, oats, beans, lentils, and eggs.

Tip # 4 – When taking natural sleep aids, it’s good to remember that each person is a unique individual and doing some experimenting with the dosage can be instrumental in achieving success. At first, err on the side of taking too little rather than too much. Another thing to keep in mind is that natural aids are not drugs and they may not work immediately with the first dose or even the first few doses. It can take up to a couple weeks to see results.

James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.” In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. In the study, taking calcium restored normal sleep patterns.

One example of a mineral-based sleep remedy is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium, magnesium and vitamin D. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

In summary, take the tips of recent research studies and take a walk each day, put the computers and cell phones away an hour before bedtime and do something relaxing, keep a high-tryprophan snack next to your bed at night, and use an effective form of calcium and magnesium before bed for a deeper, longer night’s sleep.

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

Source article: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2015/03/25/four-research-studies-give-tips-to-remedy-insomnia/

Trouble Sleeping? More Magnesium May Help (from Human Nutrition Research Center)

magnesiumBy Forrest Nielsen

Can’t sleep? You are not alone. Not being able to sleep, or insomnia, is a common complaint, especially among people older than 50. More than half of all people aged 65 years and older have sleep problems.

Not surprisingly, lack of sleep is caused mainly by factors that are more common later in life, such as breathing problems, illness and medications. Yet, scientists have proved that poor sleep is not a natural part of aging.

Five common complaints are trouble falling asleep, waking up, awaking too early, needing to nap and not feeling rested.

Lack of sleep is a health concern because it can cause attention and memory problems, depressed mood and body chemistry changes that foster heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis.

A factor getting more attention recently is poor nutrition. A low intake of the mineral magnesium may be one nutritional factor causing sleep problems.

Magnesium plays a key role in the body’s chemistry that regulates sleep. This may be why persons with long-term lack of sleep, or abnormal brain waves during deep sleep, often have low magnesium in their blood.

Some small studies with humans and rats also suggest that magnesium is needed for good sleep. Magnesium treatment increased deep sleep and improved brain waves during sleep in 12 elderly subjects. Magnesium treatment decreased time to fall asleep and improved sleep quality of 11 alcoholic patients who often have a low magnesium status. Magnesium deficiency increased time awake at the expense of deep sleep in rats. Feeding magnesium to the rats restored their sleep patterns to normal.

The diets of many people do not contain enough magnesium for good health and sleep. In 1997, the United States Food and Nutrition Board set the recommended dietary allowance (or daily intake) for magnesium at 320 milligrams for women and 420 milligrams for men between ages 51 and 70.

A national food consumption survey found that many Americans, especially older women, consume less than the recommended amount for magnesium.  Another risk factor for low magnesium status in older women is the use of calcium supplements without magnesium for bone health. High calcium intakes can make magnesium deficiency worse.

Perhaps, you have heard or read of the folk remedy of drinking a glass of warm milk before going to bed if you have trouble with falling asleep. This remedy may work for some people because milk is a fair source for magnesium. A glass of milk provides about 30 milligrams of magnesium. This amount of magnesium could be the difference between a deficient and adequate magnesium status for many people.

Other foods that have good amounts of magnesium are whole grains, nuts and green leafy vegetables. Green leafy vegetables are a good source of magnesium because the green color is chlorophyll, a chemical that contains magnesium and converts sunlight into food energy.

(From the Human Nutrition Research Center of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture).

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid featuring calcium and magnesium Sleep Minerals II.

Kimberly B. of Troy Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for two and a half years and have had restless leg syndrome my entire life. This is the first relief I’ve ever had…it’s gone for a month now.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Source: Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center : Do you have trouble sleeping? More magnesium might help.

Study: Heart Health Improved with Fruits and Veggies

Colorful fruits and vegetables are abundant in antioxidants, compounds that protect our tissues from deterioration and may help slow the aging process.  A recent study from Sweden has found that eating these foods can strengthen the heart and reduce heart failure.

Susanne Rautiainen from Harvard Medical School, and colleagues, analyzed data collected from 33,713 women enrolled in a Swedish study, ages 49 to 83 years.  The participants had been surveyed for their dietary intakes.  Over the 11 years of follow-up, 884 cases of heart failure occurred.  The good news is that the researchers found those women with the highest average antioxidant intakes were 42% less likely to develop heart failure, as compared to women with the lowest intake.

The researchers said: “We observed a lower risk of heart failure where the average intake of fruits and vegetables was 4.4 servings per day. Thus, these results suggest that following the nutritional recommendations of 5 servings of fruits and vegetables issued by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States and also the National Food Agency in Sweden, may be beneficial in heart failure prevention.”

This news is brought to you and edited by Nutrition Breakthroughs.  Since 2001 Nutrition Breakthroughs has been providing natural health articles and effective natural remedies.  Their mission is to provide nutritional supplements that get results, and therefore help people to avoid drugs and their side effects.

Since 2009, their natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II has been keeping that promise – by providing highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium that soothe even the worst insomnia and help everyone from teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms, to seniors, to get a good night’s sleep.

For more information on the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.

 

Article courtesy of Nutra Ingredients USA
http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/

Relieve Hot Flashes and Night Sweats with Sage and Raspberry Leaf Tea

Sage and Raspberry tea for hot flashesThis is a simple tea for hot flashes and night sweats that contains sage and raspberry leaves. It is not known why sage leaves reduce sweating, perhaps due to its astringent properties. (An astringent is something that causes body tissues to tighten or shrink). Raspberry leaves are traditionally used to balance female hormones. Prepare this tea fresh before drinking.

1/2 tbsp fresh sage leaves (if you use dry leaves, use half the amount)
1/2 tbsp fresh raspberry leaves (if you use dry leaves, use half the amount)
8 ounces freshly boiled water
Stevia/honey/maple syrup to taste

Wash the sage and raspberry leaves, pour the boiled water over and steep for 8-10 minutes. Sip a small glass every 3 hours.

This info is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, courtesy of the Healthy and Natural World website. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the effective natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II is the original magnesium and calcium based sleep aid and is known for soothing even the worst insomnia. It helps everyone from teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms, to older seniors, to get a good night’s sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable. After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep. I have much less interruption from hot flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

Article source: http://www.healthyandnaturalworld.com/tea-for-hot-flashes-and-night-sweats/

 

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