News and Research on Magnesium for Sleep

Posts tagged ‘go back to sleep’

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Data Finds That Getting 7 Hours of Sleep or Less can be Linked to These Nutrition Problems — Thrive Global

“This work adds to the body of growing evidence associating specific nutrient intakes with sleep outcomes,” the lead researcher said.

via Data Finds That Getting 7 Hours of Sleep or Less can be Linked to These Nutrition Problems — Thrive Global

This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

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Research Study Shows that B Vitamins Can Be a Natural Sleep Aid

vitamins for sleepThose of us who have experienced insomnia know what its like to toss and turn through the night trying to get some good sleep.  And then the next day can be filled with brain fog, irritability, exhaustion and just not quite feeling like one’s usual self.  Some will turn to sleeping drugs, only to find the effects wearing off over time and the side effects strong.

On the other hand, nutrition can be one of the most essential supports and defenses in winning the battle to achieve calmer, deeper, longer sleep.  There are some vitamins and nutrients in particular that have been shown in research studies to soothe a person’s frequent awakenings and improve overall sleep.

B vitamins can come in very handy for those experiencing insomnia or restless leg syndrome (also known as RLS).  Those who have restless leg syndrome undergo unpleasant sensations in the legs described as creeping, crawling, tingling, pulling or painful. They often suffer with chronic insomnia and sleeplessness due to the strong urge to walk or do other activities to relieve sensations in their legs at night.

One study from the journal “Sleep Medicine” published the results of 28 elderly patients who had severe RLS with night time leg cramps that disturbed their sleep. They were given B complex capsules containing B-1, B-2, B-6 and B-12.  The study authors observed that after 3 months, 86% of the patients taking vitamin B supplements had prominent remission of leg cramps, whereas those taking the placebo had no significant difference.

In this study, treatment with vitamin B complex significantly reduced the frequency, intensity, and duration of night time leg cramps. Because vitamin B complex is a relatively safe and effective alternative to quinine, the main drug used for RLS, they feel that doctors should reconsider using drugs and change the usual treatment of choice for night time leg cramps.

One’s overall brain health is closely related to healthy sleep.  From the same study in “Sleep Medicine”, the authors noted that thiamine or vitamin B-1 deficiency can cause fatigue, weakness, intestinal symptoms, memory loss and disturbed sleep. They also point out that Parkinson’s disease sufferers generally have low levels of niacin or vitamin B-3, a deficiency of which can also cause insomnia and sleeplessness.

Another point from the article is that vitamin B-6 is a necessary co-factor in the creation of amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein.  The importance of this is that brain chemicals such as serotonin and melatonin are made out of the amino acids tryptophan.  Serotonin and melatonin have key roles in supporting good sleep and cannot be produced without enough B-6.  Even a mild deficiency of B-6 results in inhibited activity of these brain nutrients and may create insomnia.

Magnesium and calcium are long-time proven sleep remedies. A study on magnesium from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran was done with 46 adults who were experiencing insomnia. Two magnesium tablets twice a day (250 mg. each) resulted in significant increases in sleep time and reduced cortisol levels in the body, which is a stress hormone that can keep people awake.

Calcium is known to soothe sleeplessness and provide a deeper sleep.  In a report called “The Nutritional Relationships of Magnesium”, the author notes that the type of insomnia associated with a calcium deficiency often causes difficulty with falling asleep.  This same study says that: “Muscle cramps associated with calcium deficiency often occur at night and without exertion.  Such cramps usually involve the calves and thighs, but not the hands or feet.”

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and founder of Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA., is someone who fought her own battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural ingredients for relaxation and deeper sleep.

The result was Sleep Minerals II, a natural sleep aid which contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for sleep and relaxation: Calcium and magnesium, along with Vitamin D and zinc. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form along with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.  These minerals are also proven to help with restless leg syndrome, bone and muscle strength, teenage insomnia and menopause insomnia.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

In summary, make good use of natural vitamins and minerals as the first line of defense in the war against sleeplessness and insomnia.

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

 

Article source: https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2018/08/06/b-vitamins-remedy-insomnia-per-study-in-sleep-journal/

 

Yogurt Helps Weight Loss and is a Natural Sleep Aid Per Research

A healthy bacteria similar to the acidophilus used in yogurt has been found in a Canadian study to help overweight women to lose weight and keep it off.  Known as “probiotics”, these healthy bacteria in the intestine are “pro” or beneficial to the health of the body.

They stimulate the immune system to be stronger, keep the stomach and bowels healthy, and help urinary health.  In addition, an earlier Stanford University study found that obese people have different gut bacteria than normal-weighted people — a first indication that gut bacteria can play a role in overall weight.

The Stanford University research has now spurred a new study, done by a team of researchers at the University of Laval in Quebec Canada.  Headed by Professor Angelo Tremblay, the researchers sought to confirm the premise that consuming probiotics could help reset the balance of intestinal flora in favor of those that promote a healthy weight.  It may be that a diet high in fat and low in fiber leads to certain bacteria flourishing at the expense of others.  They recruited 125 overweight people to test this theory.

During the first 12-week period of the Canadian study, the subjects underwent a weight-loss diet.  This was followed by a 12-week period aimed at maintaining their body weight.  Throughout the entire 24 weeks, half of the subjects took two pills daily containing probiotics, while the other half received placebos.  After the 12-week dieting period, there was an average weight loss of 8.8 pounds in the women in the probiotics group and 5.7 pounds for women in the placebo group.

The interesting difference is that at the end of the 12-week maintenance period, the weight of the women in the placebo group stayed the same, but the probiotics group continued to lose weight – a total of 11.5 pounds per person.  Upon testing, these women demonstrated having a drop in an appetite-regulating hormone, as well as less of the intestinal bacteria related to obesity.

Professor Tremblay concluded that probiotics may make the intestinal wall stronger and more able to prevent inflammatory substances from passing into the intestine and entering the bloodstream.  Those very substances and molecules that can lead to diabetes and obesity.  He believes that several types of the probiotics found in yogurts and supplements can have a similar effect.  Their study was published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Yogurt is also a proven natural sleep aid due to the high amount of calcium it contains. William Sears, M.D. says: “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin.”

Dr. Sears continues and says: “This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.”

Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep.  In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase.

One calcium-based supplement shown to be effective for insomnia is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This formula contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, which are the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, menopause insomnia, teenage insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.

Sleep Minerals II also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than hard tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals II – I’m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them.  I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.  This has been a great improvement.”

This news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs. Since 2001, Nutrition Breakthroughs has provided natural health articles and effective natural remedies.  Their mission is to provide nutritional supplements that work well and help people to avoid drugs and their side effects.

Since 2009, their natural sleep remedy Sleep Minerals II has been keeping that promise — by soothing even the worst insomnia and helping everyone from teenagers to seniors to get a good night’s sleep.  For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

 

Article source: https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2018/07/12/study-shows-an-acidophilus-like-supplement-aids-weight-loss-in-women/

Study Shows Tomato Juice Reduces Waist Size

tomatoes and tomato juice on white backgroundWho would’ve known that the red coloring matter in tomatoes is one of the most powerful natural medicines in existence?

The red color comes from a healthy plant chemical called lycopene. Lycopene is what makes the tomato a super-food — one that goes far beyond just providing something tasty to eat.

Lycopene has been shown in studies from the Journal of Nutrition to help protect against heart disease, lower cholesterol, and reduce inflammation for a stronger immune system.

Interestingly, a new study has shown that the same traits of tomato juice that can cause these internal health improvements can also enhance one’s appearance by inducing a lower body weight and a thinner waistline.

There are unlimited health benefits from eating all kinds of vegetables and fruits including preventing diabetes, lowering the risk of all types of cancers, strengthening the heart, balancing hormones, smoothing the skin and increasing energy. They are nature’s finest natural remedies.

Lycopene gives the red color to watermelons, pink grapefruits and tomatoes. Spinach, corn and avocado contain the yellow and green shades supplied by lutein which supports good eye health. Grapes and blueberries contain the blue and purple pigments known to benefit everything from memory to arthritis.

The new study on tomato juice comes from the China Medical University in Taiwan. Researchers found that a daily glass of tomato juice taken by women for two months resulted in significantly decreased body fat and body weight, as well as a smaller waist circumference and lower cholesterol. The subjects continued with their normal diet and exercise and made no changes other than drinking one nine ounce glass of tomato juice each day.

The women were divided into two groups: Those that had a reduction in body fat from the tomato juice and those that didn’t. One point that was highlighted by the study is that regardless of whether there was a loss of body fat, the tomato juice still induced a reduction in waist circumference, lowered cholesterol levels, reduced inflammation, and increased lycopene levels in each person.  Adding a simple glass of tomato juice daily can do wonders for one’s health.

Calcium is another natural substance that surprisingly has been studied for its beneficial effects on weight loss.  This famous mineral is best known providing a calmer, deeper sleep and for strengthening bones and muscles.

According to a study in the Journal of Nutrition called Calcium Intake and Reduction in Weight or Fat Mass, the researchers say: “The impact of calcium intake on weight loss or prevention of weight gain has been demonstrated in a wide age range of Caucasian and African-Americans of both genders…. The implications of these results are that calcium may play a substantial contributing role in reducing the incidence of obesity.”

One calcium-based supplement shown to be effective for insomnia is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This formula contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, menopause insomnia, teenage insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.

Wendy R. of Honolulu, Hawaii says: “My friends know that I’ve had chronic insomnia for a long time. Surprisingly, I received the Sleep Minerals II and began taking it and found out this thing really works. In the past if I ever got a good nights sleep I’d say ‘I slept like a baby’, but that’s the wrong comparison. Those little guys get up every two hours. I am actually beginning to sleep like an adult — a much-rested adult.”

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs. Since 2001 Nutrition Breakthroughs has provided natural health articles and effective natural remedies.  Their mission is to provide nutritional supplements that get results and help people to avoid drugs and their side effects.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit this page.

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2018/07/29/nutrition-breakthroughs-tomato-juice-reduces-waist-size-body-fat/

Why Do Some People Get a Charley Horse? – Magnesium for Sleep

young women calf pain on white backgroundBy Dr. Joseph Mercola, a physician trained in both traditional and natural medicine who provides up-to-date natural health information.
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This article is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium, magnesium and vitamin D based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.
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A charley horse, or muscle cramp particularly in your calf muscles, is an incredibly common condition that results in your muscles becoming tight, stiff and extremely painful. If you’re an adult, there’s a good chance you’ve had one at some point (and likely multiple points) during your lifetime.

In case you’re a trivia buff and wondering why these muscle cramps are referred to as “charley horses” (a name that’s primarily used in North America), it’s said to be a tribute to Charley “Old Hoss” Radbourne, an 1880s-era baseball pitcher who often suffered from muscle cramps during games.

Another version states the term came from a lame work horse named Charley who limped around doing various jobs around the baseball park (also in the 1880s).

Whenever a baseball player would get injured or have a cramp in the lower legs, thus limping around like Charley the horse, teammates would call the player “Charley Horse.” Regardless of the name’s origin, the pain of a charley horse is unmistakable and can be excruciating.

What Causes a Charley Horse?

According to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, about 1 in every 3 adults is affected by muscle cramps in their lower limbs. In many cases, the pain is temporary and goes away on its own, but for some the cramps interfere with sleep, quality of life and daily activities.

In one study of more than 500 people aged 60 years and older, 31 percent reported being woken up by muscle cramps and 15 percent had cramps more than three times a month. Anyone can get a charley horse, but they’re most common in the following populations and scenarios:

  • During exercise
  • At nighttime, especially in the elderly
  • In pregnant women
  • In people with neurological disease
  • During kidney dialysis

It’s not clear what triggers a charley horse to occur, but it is thought the cramp may be related to a rapidly firing nerve (up to 150 electrical dischargers per second), which causes the muscle to tense up, as opposed to an issue with the muscle tissue itself.

Many medications are also associated with muscle cramps, including statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, ACE inhibitors (blood pressure drugs), certain asthma drugs, diuretics and more. In addition, the following factors may also increase your risk of a charley horse:

  • Poor blood circulation in your legs
  • Muscle fatigue
  • Dehydration
  • Mineral deficiencies, including magnesium, potassium or calcium

magnesium and menopauseIs Magnesium Deficiency Causing Your Charley Horses?

By some estimates, up to 80 percent of Americans are not getting enough magnesium and may be deficient. Other research shows only about 25 percent of U.S. adults are getting the recommended daily amount of 310 to 320 milligrams (mg) for women and 400 to 420 for men.

Magnesium is often thought of primarily as a mineral for your heart and bones, but this is misleading. Researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, indicating that its role in human health and disease may have been vastly underestimated.

Further, if you suffer from charley horses, low levels of magnesium could be to blame. Magnesium is necessary for activating muscles and nerves, and a key sign of ongoing magnesium deficiency can be muscle contractions and cramps like charley horses.

Magnesium deficiency may be particularly problematic for your muscles in the presence of an overabundance of calcium. Americans in general tend to have a higher calcium-to-magnesium ratio in their diet, averaging about 3.5-to-1.

If you have too much calcium and not enough magnesium, your muscles will tend to go into spasm. According to Dr. Carolyn Dean, a medical and naturopathic doctor:

“What happens is the muscle and nerve function that magnesium is responsible for is diminished. If you don’t have enough magnesium, your muscles go into spasm.

Calcium causes muscle to contract. If you had a balance, the muscles would do their thing. They’d relax, contract and create their activity.”

This underscores the importance of eating a nutritious diet, which will naturally give you optimal amounts of the minerals and other nutrients your body needs.

Eating plenty of organic leafy green vegetables, nuts and seeds every day, and drinking fresh green vegetable juice will help keep your magnesium stores replenished. In addition, Epsom salt is a magnesium sulfate that can absorb into your body through your skin.

Soaking in a bath with Epsom salts is an excellent way to not only help prevent magnesium deficiency but also to soothe and relieve the pain of a charley horse.

potassiumLow Potassium Levels May Also Trigger a Charley Horse

Potassium is a mineral and electrolyte. (An electrolyte is a substance that produces an electrical conducting solution when dissolved in water. Electrolytes carry a charge and are essential for life. In our bodies, electrolytes include sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium).

Potassium is essential for your cells, tissues and organs to function properly. It plays a vital role in heart health, digestive and muscular function, bone health and more. One of the symptoms of low potassium levels is muscle cramps.

While potassium is found in many foods commonly consumed in the U.S. — including fruits, vegetables, dairy products, salmon, sardines and nuts — only 2 percent of U.S. adults get the recommended daily amount of 4,700 mg.

This is especially problematic because potassium is a nutrient that needs to be kept in proper balance with sodium in your blood. If you consume too much sodium, which is common if you eat a lot of processed foods, you’ll have an increased need for potassium.

Others who are at particular risk of low potassium, or hypokalemia, are those with chronic malabsorption syndromes, such as Crohn’s disease, or those taking heart medicine (particularly loop diuretics). However, anyone who eats a poor diet — an excess of processed foods and not enough fresh, whole foods — is potentially at risk of inadequate potassium levels and related muscle cramps.

Green vegetable juicing is an excellent way to ensure you’re getting enough nutrients for optimal health, including about 300 mg to 400 mg of potassium per cup. Some additional rich sources of potassium are:

  • Lima beans (955 mg/cup)
  • Winter squash (896 mg/cup)
  • Cooked spinach (839 mg/cup)
  • Avocado (500 mg per medium)

Foods rich in calciumToo Little Calcium May Trigger Muscle Cramps

While too much calcium in the absence of magnesium can be problematic for muscle cramps, so too can a calcium deficiency. Low blood levels of calcium (as well as magnesium) may increase the excitability of nerve endings and the muscles they stimulate.

This may be a trigger for muscle cramps, especially in the elderly and during pregnancy. If you’re deficient in vitamin D, meanwhile, your body may have inadequate calcium absorption, again predisposing you to muscle cramps.

It’s very important to maintain a proper balance of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and also vitamin K2, as these four nutrients perform an intricate dance together, with one supporting the other. If you’re calcium deficient, your best bet is to increase consumption of foods high in calcium before opting for a supplement. This is because many high-calcium foods also contain naturally high amounts of vitamin K2; nature cleverly gives us these two nutrients in combination, so they work optimally.

Good sources of calcium include nuts, seeds and raw, organic, grass-fed dairy especially cheeses, and vegetables, although veggies aren’t high in vitamin K2. One exception is fermented vegetables where a starter culture specifically designed to produce ample amounts of vitamin K2 was used.

Homemade bone broth is another excellent source. Simply simmer leftover bones over low heat for an entire day to extract the calcium from the bones. You can use this broth for soups and stews or drink it straight.

What to Do If You Get a Charley Horse

A charley horse often occurs without notice, sometimes waking you up from sound sleep. If you’re lying down when the pain starts, stand up and put some weight on your foot. Walking around will help to increase blood circulation to your muscles and possibly help to soothe and relax the cramp.

charley horse stretch leg crampYou can also try a simple stretch. If the cramp is in your calf in the back of your lower leg, pull your toes and foot upward until you feel a stretch in the back of your leg. You can also do this sitting down with your legs outstretched. Put a towel around your feet and gently pull both ends toward you until you feel a stretch.

As mentioned, soaking in an Epsom salt bath may also help to relieve pain (and possibly help with prevention). Massaging the area and applying a heat pack, which will increase blood flow to the area, promoting healing and soothing pain, may also help.

Staying well-hydrated is also important for muscle cramp prevention. You’ll want to drink enough pure filtered water so that your urine is pale yellow in color. In addition, performing regular stretching exercises on your legs may help reduce your risk of a charley horse.

This article is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium, magnesium and vitamin D based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

Visit www.Mercola.com for evidence-based health information and free health
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4 Research Studies Show Good Insomnia Remedies

Sleep Minerals IIAlmost six out of ten Americans experience insomnia and sleep problems at least a few nights a week, as reported in a recent study done by the National Sleep Foundation. Insomnia is defined as “An inability to fall asleep or remain asleep long enough to feel rested, especially when the problem continues over time.”

In an effort to combat this, as many as twenty-five percent of the people in the U.S. turn to sleep drugs. Because most people would prefer to avoid the side effects and addiction of sleep medications, research scientists have been busy studying nutritional and lifestyle approaches to getting better sleep.

Tip # 1 – We live in an electronics-oriented world, from computers, to cell phones, to texting, to reading books on tablets. These tools help increase our efficiency and ability to work and learn and communicate, but when it comes to getting good sound sleep, they can interfere.

One study from a university in New York found that exposure to light from electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about twenty two percent. Melatonin is a hormone made in the brain that helps to regulate the sleep/wake cycle. It is present in higher amounts at night. The researchers recommend shutting off all electronic devices at least one hour before bedtime and doing some relaxing things before bed.

Tip # 2 – Regarding sounder, deeper sleep resulting from taking walks, studies at the University of Arizona have found that walking more than six blocks a day at a normal pace significantly improves sleep at night for women.  Scientists suspect that walking helps to set our biological clock into a consistent sleep pattern. Walking can help increase “endorphins”, which are protein-like chemicals made in the brain that can have a relaxing effect, a pain-relieving effect, and can also reduce stress and increase well-being.

Tip # 3 – Sometimes hunger can strike at 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning and keep one awake. If this occurs, eat something with high protein such as turkey. Turkey contains tryptophan, which is an amino acid (a component of protein) that has a calming effect. According to Ray Sahelian, M.D., “Tryptophan ….can be converted at night into melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone.”

As a note, concentrated tryptophan capsules are not recommended as they can create grogginess in the morning and take some time to wear off. Other foods that are high in tryptophan include nuts, seeds, chicken, fish, oats, beans, lentils, and eggs.

Tip # 4 – When taking natural sleep aids, it’s good to remember that each person is a unique individual and doing some experimenting with the dosage can be instrumental in achieving success. At first, err on the side of taking too little rather than too much. Another thing to keep in mind is that natural aids are not drugs and they may not work immediately with the first dose or even the first few doses. It can take up to a couple weeks to see results.

James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.” In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. In the study, taking calcium restored normal sleep patterns.

One example of a mineral-based sleep remedy is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium, magnesium and vitamin D. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

In summary, take the tips of recent research studies and take a walk each day, put the computers and cell phones away an hour before bedtime and do something relaxing, keep a high-tryprophan snack next to your bed at night, and use an effective form of calcium and magnesium before bed for a deeper, longer night’s sleep.

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

Source article: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2015/03/25/four-research-studies-give-tips-to-remedy-insomnia/

Trouble Sleeping? More Magnesium May Help (from Human Nutrition Research Center)

magnesiumBy Forrest Nielsen

Can’t sleep? You are not alone. Not being able to sleep, or insomnia, is a common complaint, especially among people older than 50. More than half of all people aged 65 years and older have sleep problems.

Not surprisingly, lack of sleep is caused mainly by factors that are more common later in life, such as breathing problems, illness and medications. Yet, scientists have proved that poor sleep is not a natural part of aging.

Five common complaints are trouble falling asleep, waking up, awaking too early, needing to nap and not feeling rested.

Lack of sleep is a health concern because it can cause attention and memory problems, depressed mood and body chemistry changes that foster heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis.

A factor getting more attention recently is poor nutrition. A low intake of the mineral magnesium may be one nutritional factor causing sleep problems.

Magnesium plays a key role in the body’s chemistry that regulates sleep. This may be why persons with long-term lack of sleep, or abnormal brain waves during deep sleep, often have low magnesium in their blood.

Some small studies with humans and rats also suggest that magnesium is needed for good sleep. Magnesium treatment increased deep sleep and improved brain waves during sleep in 12 elderly subjects. Magnesium treatment decreased time to fall asleep and improved sleep quality of 11 alcoholic patients who often have a low magnesium status. Magnesium deficiency increased time awake at the expense of deep sleep in rats. Feeding magnesium to the rats restored their sleep patterns to normal.

The diets of many people do not contain enough magnesium for good health and sleep. In 1997, the United States Food and Nutrition Board set the recommended dietary allowance (or daily intake) for magnesium at 320 milligrams for women and 420 milligrams for men between ages 51 and 70.

A national food consumption survey found that many Americans, especially older women, consume less than the recommended amount for magnesium.  Another risk factor for low magnesium status in older women is the use of calcium supplements without magnesium for bone health. High calcium intakes can make magnesium deficiency worse.

Perhaps, you have heard or read of the folk remedy of drinking a glass of warm milk before going to bed if you have trouble with falling asleep. This remedy may work for some people because milk is a fair source for magnesium. A glass of milk provides about 30 milligrams of magnesium. This amount of magnesium could be the difference between a deficient and adequate magnesium status for many people.

Other foods that have good amounts of magnesium are whole grains, nuts and green leafy vegetables. Green leafy vegetables are a good source of magnesium because the green color is chlorophyll, a chemical that contains magnesium and converts sunlight into food energy.

(From the Human Nutrition Research Center of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture).

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid featuring calcium and magnesium Sleep Minerals II.

Kimberly B. of Troy Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for two and a half years and have had restless leg syndrome my entire life. This is the first relief I’ve ever had…it’s gone for a month now.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Source: Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center : Do you have trouble sleeping? More magnesium might help.

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