News and Research on Magnesium for Sleep

Posts tagged ‘sleep foods’

Conquer Insomnia: Nutrients and Minerals that Help You Get Better Sleep

Sleep better with nutrition and nutrientsGuest Post by Sharon Walsh of BestMattressReviews.com *************************
Presented by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II
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Adults need a full seven to eight hours of sleep every night to stay healthy, yet many people get far less.  Stress, medical conditions, and poor sleep hygiene can all come between you and the rest you need. Sleep hygiene refers to those habits and practices that are conducive to sleeping well on a regular basis.

There are also positive interactions that occur between the sleep hormone melatonin and the foods you eat that can help you sleep better. The right foods help set your circadian rhythms so that when it’s time to hit the pillow, you’re ready to settle down for the night. Cirdadian rhythms are guided by our internal body clock.  These cycles tell our bodies when to sleep, rise, and eat – regulating many physiological processes. The cycles are triggered by environmental cues, like sunlight and temperature.

Tryptophan – More Than Turkey

The tryptophan found in turkey is legendary in the food world for making people drowsy. While the sleep-inducing properties in your Thanksgiving dinner may have more to do with the size of the meal than the one slice of meat you eat, tryptophan does also help you sleep, but not in the direct way many people think. The body uses tryptophan to make serotonin and melatonin, both of which are natural hormones made in the brain that help set your circadian rhythms.

Tryptophan can be found in far more foods than turkey. If you’re looking for other natural sources, try adding these foods to your diet for an extra boost:

  • Walnuts: Walnuts are not only a good source of tryptophan but a natural source of melatonin itself. They make a great bedtime snack.

  • Seeds and Nuts: Pumpkin and squash seeds, in particular, provide a quick dose of tryptophan.

  • Cheese: If you’re looking for a healthy kick, try reduced-fat mozzarella or add something a little different like Fontina and Edam.

Calcium – Dairy and More

A warm glass of milk is more than an old wives’ tale. The calcium in dairy products and many other foods help the brain use tryptophan to make melatonin. Cheese, yogurt, milk, and even ice cream have the calcium your body needs to help regulate your sleep cycle. If you’re looking for non-dairy foods to get a calcium boost consider trying:

  • Spinach and Other Leafy Greens: These brightly colored vegetables are loaded with nutrients. Other greens like kale and collard greens also have high amounts of calcium.

  • Fortified Orange Juice: Calcium is important for many body processes. It just makes sense to add it to this popular breakfast drink. A quick glass of orange juice also gives you a dose of vitamin C.

  • Enriched Grains: Enriched grains and breads give you some versatility in how you get your calcium.  Quinoa may be even a better choice, as it offers approximately 60-100 mg of calcium, not to mention a high amount of potassium, zinc and protein.

Develop Good Sleep Hygiene (Habits)

All your healthy eating may go to waste if you don’t develop good sleep hygiene. Your sleep environment can make or break your ability to get a full night’s rest. If you suffer from insomnia or need to get a few more hours of rest, try:

  • A Bedtime Routine: Not just for kids, a bedtime routine can trigger your brain to start sending the ‘sleep’ signals to the rest of your body. A warm glass of milk (remember the importance of calcium), a warm bath, writing the next day’s plans down in a journal, are a few ideas to get you started. You can include anything that helps you relax.

  • Cutting Screen Time: The bright light from televisions, e-readers, and smartphones can fool the brain into thinking it’s daytime, which means reducing melatonin and staying awake. Start shutting down your screens at least an hour before bedtime to keep your circadian rhythms in sync.

  • Bedtime Snack: While you want to avoid a heavy meal before bed, if hunger pains keep you awake, try eating a healthy snack. A handful of nuts, seeds, or cheese and crackers makes a good snack because they have ingredients that promote sleep.   Raw almonds or almond butter are good choices as almonds contain 266 mg of calcium per 3 1/2 ounces.

Keep these sleep-healthy tips in mind in order to increase the quantity and quality of your nightly rest and have more energy in your days!

This natural health news blog is presented by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

This article is a guest post provided by https://www.bestmattressreviews.com/

 

Article source: https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2018/01/28/good-sleep-nutrients-to-help-you-get-more-of-it/

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Vitamin D and Calcium Effective Remedies for Gum Disease, Insomnia

healthy teeth and gumsA bright smile, white teeth and healthy gums are something everyone would like to enjoy.  Gingivitis is a very common form of inflammatory gum disease caused by bacteria in the mouth. It causes gums to become red, swollen and bleed easily during brushing or flossing.

If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to an even more severe form of gum disease called periodontitis, which also may harm the bones underneath the gums.

Symptoms of periodontitis include bad breath, toothache, loose teeth, receding gums or tooth loss.  According to the study called “Prevalence of Periodontitis in Adults”, almost half of all American adults have mild, moderate or severe periodontal disease.  For those who are 65 or older, the percentage increases to 70%.

Researchers have previously discovered that people who consume low amounts of calcium and vitamin D can develop bone loss and osteoporosis.  Scientists at the Saint Louis University Center for Advanced Dental Education reasoned that because vitamin D also has antimicrobial effects and can remedy the inflammatory response, it would be reasonable to pursue a study to determine whether calcium and vitamin D may have a positive effect on periodontal disease.

The study included 51 people who were receiving periodontal maintenance therapy.  23 were taking vitamin D and calcium during the study and 28 did not.  All of the participants had at least two areas in their mouth that had loss of gum tissue and reduced support around the teeth.

At the end of the study, those taking the vitamin D and calcium had fewer bleeding sites, less attachment loss, and smaller open spaces between the teeth and gums.  The researchers concluded there was a good trend for improved health of the gums, teeth, and bones in the mouth with the use of these nutritional supplements.

Studies have also proven that calcium can prevent osteoporosis, reduce high blood pressure, relax the nerves and muscles, prevent colon cancer and kidney stones, and act as an effective remedy for insomnia and sleeplessness.

In one study called “The Nutritional Relationships of Magnesium”, the author notes that the type of insomnia associated with a calcium deficiency is one that causes difficulty with falling asleep. On the other hand, the classical sign of magnesium deficiency is insomnia characterized by falling asleep easily, but awakening frequently throughout the night, and with individuals finding themselves tired even after several hours of sleep.

It’s important to note that a balanced calcium magnesium ratio is important to overall health, and these two minerals should be taken together for best results (in a two to one ratio with twice as much calcium and magnesium).  The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.

William Sears, M.D. writes: “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are some of the top sleep-inducing foods.”

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and founder of Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale California, is someone who fought her own battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural insomnia remedies for relaxation and deeper sleep.

The result was Sleep Minerals II, a natural sleep remedy that contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D and zinc. These are the most effective minerals for sleeplessness as well as for menopause insomnia, heart health, restless leg syndrome and bone strength.  The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than the Sleep Minerals.  I’m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them.  I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

Calcium and vitamin D are two of the key cornerstones of good health. They play many roles in the body and both should be included in the diet.

This natural health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and a supplier of effective natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II, as well as Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails, and more energy.

 

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2017/09/30/study-calcium-and-vitamin-d-improve-gum-health-and-periodontal-disease/

Helpful Insomnia Chart with Tips and Sleep Remedies

Hello,

Shared below for you is one of the latest insomnia charts from the National Sleep Foundation.  It contains some interesting statistics on sleep and insomnia.  Insomnia is defined as the inability to fall asleep, stay asleep, return to sleep, or can include all of these.  When someone experiences insomnia for at least three nights per week for at least three months, it is considered “chronic insomnia”.

Forty million Americans experience insomnia each year and there is an increased prevalence of insomnia in women and older adults.  It can be caused by stress, anxiety, depression, or major life changes such as with jobs or relationships.  Other causes of sleeplessness include various medical conditions or poor sleep habits such as going to bed too late, consuming caffeine too late in the day, or using computers or cell phones too close to bed time.

Many natural sleep remedies are making the news headlines lately, with research and studies discovering ones that are drug-free and effective.  For example, one study called “The Nutritional Relationships of Magnesium”, found that the type of insomnia associated with a calcium deficiency causes difficulty with falling asleep.

On the other hand, the classical sign of magnesium deficiency is insomnia characterized by falling asleep easily, but awakening frequently throughout the night, with individuals finding themselves tired even after several hours of sleep.

Walking has been shown to help with insomnia. Studies at the University of Arizona found that walking more than six blocks a day at a normal pace significantly improves sleep at night for women.  Scientists suspect that this exercise helps set our biological clock into a consistent wake/sleep pattern, or that it may boost the brain’s production of melatonin, a chemical in the brain that’s produced at night time and encourages good sleep.

Tart cherry juice is another proven natural sleep remedy. In a study published in the European Journal of Nutrition, researchers found that drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice results in significant sleep improvements such as longer overall sleep time, less daytime napping, and increased overall sleep efficiency (the ratio of the time spent in bed to the time spent sleeping).  The researchers credited the benefits of cherry juice to its high natural melatonin content.

A handful of walnuts with dinner or in the evening can also improve sleep.  Russel Reiter, Ph.D., a professor of cellular biology at the University of Texas Health Science Center says, “Relatively few foods have been examined for their melatonin content. Our studies demonstrate that walnuts contain melatonin, that it is absorbed when it is eaten, and that it improves our ability to resist stress in the body and also keep the heart healthy.”

Natural remedies can be a strong force in the fight against insomnia.  Those with sleeping problems are encouraged to seek out and try ones that may assist them to get a regular good night’s sleep.

This natural health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

insomnia chart

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2017/11/02/new-insomnia-chart-with-definitions-and-sleep-remedies/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Research Shows Benefits of Regular Sleep: Happiness, Calmness

benefits of sleepSleep is such valuable and vital part of life and health.  Almost six out of ten Americans report having sleeplessness and insomnia at least a few nights a week, according to the National Sleep Foundation.  More and more research is being done that connects the benefits of good sleep to greater well-being, lower disease rates, more happiness, sharper mental capabilities and less fatigue.

A newly completed joint study from the Division of Sleep Disorders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston has found that 204 college students have been benefited greatly by getting regular, good sleep.  These students, who were between the ages of 18 and 25, participated in a 30-day study that measured their sleeping times and duration.

When the students made the transition from irregular sleep patterns to regular sleep during the week, there were measurable, significant improvements in their levels of evening and morning happiness, a higher level of healthiness and better calmness and composure during the week.  There was even increased well-being on the day following the week of improved sleep.

The lead author, Akane Sano, PhD, who is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, said that:  “Irregular sleep-wake schedules are common in our modern society.  Our results indicate the importance of sleep regularity, in addition to sleep duration, and that regular sleep is associated with improved well-being.”

In another interesting study that was published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, professional baseball players increased their hours of sleep over a five night period and then demonstrated significant improvements in mental processing speed.  In addition, their tension, fatigue and sleepiness during the day, all decreased by over one-third.

Cheri D. Mah, lead researcher at the University of California San Francisco Human Performance Center said: “Our study indicates that short-term sleep extension of one additional hour for five days resulted in demonstrated benefits for the visual search abilities of athletes, as well as improvement in their quick response.  Fatigue over a season can negatively impact performance and sleep extension during periods of high training volumes may be a practical recovery strategy.”

For a nutritional approach to insomnia, the minerals calcium and magnesium have been shown to be effective sleep remedies that can increase the quality of life.  In a study from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran, research was done with 46 adults who were experiencing insomnia.  Taking magnesium oxide tablets resulted in significant increases in sleep time and reduced the cortisol levels in their bodies, which is a stress hormone that can keep people awake.

In another research study from the Human Nutrition Research Center of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, scientists found that a high magnesium diet is associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. Foods high in magnesium include green leafy vegetables, black beans, pumpkin seeds, almonds, avocados, figs, bananas, brown rice, and nuts and seeds.

One supplement with highly absorbable forms of magnesium and calcium is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. These are the most well researched minerals for insomnia and waking during the night, as well as for heart health, aches and pains, bone strength and menopause insomnia.  Sleep Minerals II includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules.  This provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.R.C. of Massachusetts says: “I had become dependent on sleeping drugs and couldn’t sleep without them. Now I take the Sleep Minerals before bed and I can sleep through the night without drugs. I’m also able to easily fall back to sleep if I do have to get up. Another benefit is it helps alleviate my chronic fatigue and aches and pains.”

The benefits of achieving better sleep are appearing in countless research studies and the energy invested in obtaining it is well worth the effort. For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2017/07/29/studies-show-better-sleep-benefits-college-students-and-pro-baseball-players/

Studies on Eating Healthy Fats to Sleep Better – Remedy Insomnia

healthy fats for good sleepThe link between what we eat and how we sleep is closely related, especially when it comes to consuming healthy fats.

In an article from the journal “Endocrinology – An Integrated Approach” (endocrinology deals with the glands and hormones), the author writes that all hormones are made from cholesterol.  This includes estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, adrenal gland hormones, vitamin D, and the sleep hormone melatonin. 

Eating healthy fats with our meals can play a vital role in helping us sleep better and achieve greater health, as these provide the basic building blocks for cholesterol production and hormones.  The best fats to eat are nutrient rich foods like eggs, natural butter, salmon, sardines, shrimp, cod liver oil, avocados and coconut oil.

Dr. Joseph Mercola, a physician trained in both traditional and natural medicine who provides up-to-date natural health information says: “If you’re confused about cholesterol, it’s not your fault. Cholesterol has been a highly publicized scapegoat for causing heart disease for decades, and many have diligently cut all cholesterol-rich foods (which are often also nutrient-rich foods) from their diets as a result.”

For good heart health, Dr. Mercola says to: “Replace harmful vegetable oils and synthetic hydrogenated fats such as margarine with healthy fats, including olive oil, butter, avocado, pastured eggs and coconut oil (remember olive oil should be used cold only — use coconut oil for cooking and baking).”

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, M.D., says: “Hormones accomplish a myriad of functions in the body, from regulation of our metabolism, to energy production, mineral assimilation, brain, muscle, and bone formation, to behavior, emotion and reproduction….People whose bodies are unable to produce enough cholesterol do need to have plenty of foods rich in cholesterol in order to provide their organs with this essential-to-life substance.”

Milk is well-known for its positive effects on sleep, and dairy foods contain cholesterol, however some people are not able to digest dairy well and are better able to assimilate fermented dairy foods.  Milk also has the benefit of containing calcium, which has been found in studies to soothe insomnia.

In one study from the European Journal of Clinical Neurology, researchers tested the use of milk that was fermented with yogurt cultures for its effect on sleep quality.  They discovered that there was a significant improvement in the time needed to fall asleep, as well as a reduced number of night time awakenings for the participants who drank the fermented milk daily.  No significant changes in sleep were observed for the placebo group.

Regarding the use of minerals for better sleep, one study called “The Nutritional Relationships of Magnesium”, notes that the type of insomnia associated with a calcium deficiency causes difficulty with falling asleep. The classical sign of magnesium deficiency is insomnia characterized by falling asleep easily, but awakening frequently throughout the night, with individuals finding themselves tired even after several hours of sleep.

A balanced calcium magnesium ratio is important to overall health, and these two minerals should be taken together for best results, in a two to one ratio with twice as much calcium as magnesium.  The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.

In addition, a softgel form containing healthy carrier oils mixed with the minerals is more digestible than tablets or capsules and provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep. One popular formula that has these qualities is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for relaxation: calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin d, zinc, and heart-healthy rice bran oil in a softgel.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

In summary, eating good healthy fats and also taking enough sleep-inducing minerals, can be a good combination for achieving better sleep.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit this information page.

 

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2016/12/18/research-shows-healthy-fats-improve-sleep-quality/

Foods To Help You Sleep: Top 5 Articles from Nutrition Breakthroughs

The Nutrition Breakthroughs Blog has provided several articles on the best foods to help you sleep, and those that follow below are the top 5 most popular ones of all time.

1. Sleep Foods Chart: The Top Proven Foods for Insomnia

This article features a chart that summarizes research studies on foods that are high in the natural sleep hormone known as melatonin. Other foods are proving themselves good sources of potassium, calcium and magnesium – all shown to help remedy insomnia.

2. Melatonin Rich Fruits for Sleep: Studies from Nutrition Breakthroughs    fruit melatonin

Melatonin levels start rising in the evening and go up to a peak level in the early hours of the morning, perhaps around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m, and then they reduce. This may partially explain why some people can sleep fine for a few hours and then suddenly find themselves wide awake.

The research study showing how tropical fruits increase melatonin was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.  See the details in this article.

3. Insomnia Remedies: The Best and Worst Foods for Promoting Sleep

This article includes a great, short chart that contains the five best foods and five worst foods for promoting sleep.

Some foods can act as natural sleep aids, while others can make your time in bed a struggle with tossing and turning all night.

heathiest foods4. Food for Sleep: Study Says Salmon Remedies Insomnia

Researchers in Norway have proved that eating fish has a positive impact on good sleep and overall daily functioning.

5. Insomnia Remedies: The Science Behind Sleep Inducing Foods

This article focuses on articles from research journals that have studied which foods are best for inducing sleep, and it also has some doctor recommendations on good bedtime snacks.

This collection of natural health articles on foods for sleep is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2016/10/01/foods-to-help-you-sleep-top-5-articles-from-nutrition-breakthroughs/

Foods for Sleep: Study Says Fish Helps Sleep and Insomnia

Salmon for heart and joints

A good night’s sleep is one of the four main pillars of health, with the other three being eating healthy food, getting regular exercise, and having a positive outlook. The U.S. National Institutes of Health reports that up to 70 million U.S. adults experience sleeplessness and insomnia, with 63 billion dollars lost each year in productivity.

On a personal level, those who have trouble sleeping are familiar with the many ways it affects their lives.  In an effort to help people sleep better, research scientists are discovering that eating certain foods can have a profound effect on the quality of sleep.

One good example is a recent study from the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.  Researchers in Norway have combined two of the major health pillars into one by proving that eating fish has a positive impact on good sleep and overall daily functioning.  In this study, 95 males were divided into two groups: one that ate salmon three times per week, and the other group that ate an alternative meal (chicken, pork or beef). During the 6 month study period, their quality of sleep was measured in several ways including the amount of time needed to fall asleep, and the actual time spent sleeping in bed vs. their time awake.

The results showed that eating fish had a positive impact on sleep in all the ways it was measured. The researchers mentioned that fish is a source of the amino acid tryptophan, which is a precursor for melatonin, and that other studies have found tryptophan in foods increases sleepiness in the evening. The fish group also reported better daily functioning, alertness and performance.

In this study, vitamin D levels were also found to have a significant impact on sleep quality.  Blood samples were collected during the study that measured the participant’s vitamin D, and those in the fish-eating group had a level that was closer to optimum.  The study revealed a major, positive relationship between daily functioning and a better vitamin D level.  Those eating the salmon had higher levels of vitamin D and had better sleep quality, shorter wake times and a higher percentage of sleeping time while in bed.

The study also uncovered that eating fish creates a positive improvement in heart rate variability.  This is a measurement of the length of time between heart beats, and a greater variability between the beats shows that a person is stronger, more adaptive and physically flexible.  In addition, the fish group had a significant increase in basic heart power.

Several other foods have also been proven to help with sleep and insomnia such as bananas, walnuts, tart cherries, turkey, almonds, and supplements containing potassium, vitamin D, zinc, calcium and magnesium.  In a study from the European Neurology Journal, researchers uncovered that calcium levels were higher in the body during the deepest levels of sleep and that insomnia is related to a calcium deficiency.  When the blood calcium level was normalized, optimum sleep was restored.

This natural health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

 

Reference: Fish Consumption, Sleep and Daily Functioning – http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4013386/

 

Article source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/blog/2016/07/16/foods-promote-sleep-study-on-fish-remedying-insomnia/

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